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I find most example code on the web to be unnecessarily verbose and cryptic. Here is one example, of something I recently needed to learn:

// from http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/#5

import java.lang.reflect.*;

   public class method2 {
      public int add(int a, int b)
      {
         return a + b;
      }

      public static void main(String args[])
      {
         try {
            Class cls = Class.forName("method2");
            Class partypes[] = new Class[2];
            partypes[0] = Integer.TYPE;
            partypes[1] = Integer.TYPE;
            Method meth = cls.getMethod(
              "add", partypes);
            method2 methobj = new method2();
            Object arglist[] = new Object[2];
            arglist[0] = new Integer(37);
            arglist[1] = new Integer(47);
            Object retobj 
              = meth.invoke(methobj, arglist);
            Integer retval = (Integer)retobj;
            System.out.println(retval.intValue());
         }
         catch (Throwable e) {
            System.err.println(e);
         }
      }
   }

First, this was old code, and the compiler issued a warning, so I googled around and fixed that first:

// from http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/#5
// as corrected according to
// http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reflect/class/classTrouble.html

import java.lang.reflect.*;

   public class method3 {
      public int add(int a, int b)
      {
         return a + b;
      }

      public static void main(String args[])
      {
         try {
            Class<?> cls = Class.forName("method3");
            Class partypes[] = new Class[2];
            partypes[0] = Integer.TYPE;
            partypes[1] = Integer.TYPE;
            Method meth = cls.getMethod(
              "add", partypes);
            method3 methobj = new method3();
            Object arglist[] = new Object[2];
            arglist[0] = new Integer(37);
            arglist[1] = new Integer(47);
            Object retobj 
              = meth.invoke(methobj, arglist);
            Integer retval = (Integer)retobj;
            System.out.println(retval.intValue());
         }
         catch (Throwable e) {
            System.err.println(e);
         }
      }
   }

Now, what the heck is a "partype"? "arglist" is more understandable, but still those are unnecessary IMO. I then slimmed it down to this:

// from http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/#5
// as corrected according to
// http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reflect/class/classTrouble.html
// and decrufted by jc.unternet.net

import java.lang.reflect.*;

   public class method4 {
      public int add(int a, int b)
      {
         return a + b;
      }

      public static void main(String args[])
      {
         try {
            Class<?> cls = Class.forName("method4");
            Method meth = cls.getMethod(
              "add", new Class[] {Integer.TYPE, Integer.TYPE});
            method4 methobj = new method4();
            Object retobj 
              = meth.invoke(methobj, new Object[]
                {new Integer(37), new Integer(47)});
            Integer retval = (Integer)retobj;
            System.out.println(retval.intValue());
         }
         catch (Throwable e) {
            System.err.println(e);
         }
      }
   }

Now I'll probably never be considered an expert in any language, and particularly not Java, because I use it so rarely. So, Java professionals: do you consider the revised code more, or less readable, and if so why? How would you improve the example?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by jzd, Bart Kiers, Jim Lewis, Carlos Heuberger, Graviton Apr 13 '11 at 3:15

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1  
This seems like a question that is more on-topic at "Code Review". –  jzd Apr 12 '11 at 18:08
    
what is "code review", another SE site? is it off topic here though? –  jcomeau_ictx Apr 12 '11 at 18:09
    
partypes is probably the type of the parameters for the function you are reflecting. I don't think this is optimization IMO. You will probably run into issues down the line if you were to use something like this in production calling variable types other than integers on a function like this. –  clamchoda Apr 12 '11 at 18:12
    
@jcomeau_ictx Just curious, does your compiler throw you errors (Thanks for the topic, you're providing a good read:P) –  clamchoda Apr 12 '11 at 18:15
    
@Chris Buckler: no errors for what I posted. Still trying to integrate the suggestions, and getting lots of weird errors :^\ –  jcomeau_ictx Apr 12 '11 at 19:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I would probably follow the coding conventions and use an upper-case letter for the first character of the class name. I would use Integer.valueOf(37) or just 37 over new Integer(37). I would utilize varargs for passing in the parameter types to getMethod. I would not load the class by name since it can be linked statically. And casting to Integer is pointless, you can just pass it to println as an Object.

public static void main(String args[])
 {
     try {
        Class<Method4> cls = Method4.class;
        Method method = cls.getMethod("add", Integer.TYPE, Integer.TYPE);
        Method4 methobj = new Method4();
        Object retobj = method.invoke(methobj, 37, 47);
        System.out.println(retobj);
     }
     catch (Throwable e) {
        System.err.println(e);
     }
  }

Though to be honest, using Reflection here is ridiculous anyhow:

 public static void main(String[] args) {
     System.out.println(new Method4().add(37, 47));
 }

But then add doesn't really give you anything that + doesn't:

 public static void main(String[] args) {
     System.out.println(37 + 47);
 }

In short, it's such a contrived example critiquing the code might not be the best use of time :-).

share|improve this answer
    
that's another thing I got from the example code, but thanks and +1 –  jcomeau_ictx Apr 12 '11 at 18:15
    
hmm, 37 works! for some reason I thought it had to be encapsulated into an Integer. has something changed in the language? an int never used to be an Integer, that I remember. –  jcomeau_ictx Apr 12 '11 at 18:17
    
Does it compile w.o warnings if you use "just 37" without defining partypes? Thanks ahead! –  clamchoda Apr 12 '11 at 18:18
    
@jcomeau: Look up "autoboxing". It's a feature that was added in 1.5 with Generics. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 18:18
    
@Chris: Yes it works just fine. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 18:25

Mark Peters had what I consider to be the best reply, but went a little too far and obviated the purpose for which I wanted to use reflection. So here's my riff on his best, and thanks all for your input. Let's hope it gets a good Google pagerank so new developers don't get led down a thorny path.

// from http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/#5
// as corrected according to
// http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reflect/class/classTrouble.html
// and improved at StackOverflow.com

   public class Method4 {
      public int add(int a, int b)
      {
         return a + b;
      }

      public static void main(String args[])
      {
         try {
            Class<Method4> cls = Method4.class;
            java.lang.reflect.Method method = cls.getMethod(
              "add", Integer.TYPE, Integer.TYPE);
            Method4 method4 = new Method4();
            Integer result = (Integer)method.invoke(method4, 37, 47);
            System.out.println(result);
         }
         catch (Throwable error) {
            System.err.println(error);
         }
      }
   }
share|improve this answer

I assume this is a pedantic discussion. I see where you got this example from and I agree that the original method is not concise and the nomenclature is not ideal. I think the point of that original article is to explain each individual step, so each operation is done in a separate line, rather than chaining them.

I think your code is more concise and better than the original code. ( but the exception handling could be better in both cases and usage of generics in your case is confusing).

But it were a practical problem, then I would suggest not using reflection directly. Reflection is a hassle, with its multitude of non type safe operations and multitude of exceptions. I will use some abstraction library like Apache BeanUtils to screen me from reflection api, better yet, not use reflection at all. In case of need for a dynamic language, Groovy is a much better solution, than trying to use reflection.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it fine to leave out the partypes? I too am now on the fence about this... –  clamchoda Apr 12 '11 at 18:17
    
@chris, He has just in lined it. Either way its not a huge optimization. –  doc_180 Apr 12 '11 at 18:21

Well I'd say it's pretty obvious that "partype" stands for parameter type from the context we're talking (method invocation per reflection).

And the only difference I see there is that you inlined all the paramters for the function calls, which is fine as long as its simple and understandable. But usually using some well namend local variables (I wouldn't consider "partypes" especially great, but since we're talking about method invocation it's imho clear in context) is useful as a kind of documentation and to keep the lines shorter (1 LOC over several lines is often harder to read imo)

Personally the only things I would remove in both cases would be the retobj variable - just cast the result to Integer from the get go - and using Wildcards instead of the exact definitions - if you use wildcards you may get rid of a compiler warning but it's just as useless.

share|improve this answer

You are using the generics with wildcards '?' and it's really harder to read.

But using reflection it's not that hard, and is a little easy to understand, take a look to this code modified by me

Consider this class

package test.pack;
public class Method4 {
  public int add(int a, int b)
  {
     return a + b;
  }
}

And this another one:

import java.lang.reflect.*;
  public class Test{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
     try {
        Class<Method4> cls = Class.forName("test.pack.Method4");
        Class[] params = {Integer.class, Integer.class};
        Method meth = cls.getMethod("add", params);
        Method4 methobj = (Method4) cls.newInstance();
        Object[] args = {new Integer(37), new Integer(47)};
        Object retobj = meth.invoke(methobj, args);
        Integer retval = (Integer)retobj;
        System.out.println(retval.intValue());
     }
     catch (Throwable e) {
        System.err.println(e);
     }
  }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
You got "args" and "params" backwards. What you call args is an array of parameter types, and what you call params is an array of arguments. –  ColinD Apr 12 '11 at 18:12
    
true, you can edit it when see things like that ;) –  Marcos Vasconcelos Apr 12 '11 at 18:13
    
+1 thanks for the answer. I got the <?> wildcard example from that second page referenced; I don't claim to understand "generics" whatsoever! –  jcomeau_ictx Apr 12 '11 at 18:14
    
I think you'd need to put in an unchecked cast there to forego the wildcarded Class<?>. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 18:17
    
I just thought I'd point it out in a comment because I think people mix those up fairly often and I thought it might be good to have a comment there that might help someone down the line to realize the difference between them. Might be confusing now that it's correct though. –  ColinD Apr 12 '11 at 18:19

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