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I've some stored procedures that contains stuff like this :

SELECT columnA, columnB, COUNT(*) AS "COUNT" INTO temporaryTable
FROM tableA
WHERE columnA = "A"
  AND ISNULL(columnB, "B") = "B"
GROUP BY columnA, columnB
HAVING columnA = "A"
  AND ISNULL(columnB, "B") = "B"
SELECT * FROM temporaryTable -- There is not necessary to have an empty line between two instructions.

As said, there are procedures, so many instructions are in the same script.

I load each of theses procedures in a StringBuilder (that contains the same script that shown above).

What I want to do is to remove the HAVING part if (and only IF !) it is exactly the same as in the WHERE part (as above).

So I immediatly though at the regular expressions.

I've something like this :

    static string RemoveHaving(Match m)
    {
        if (m.Groups[3].Value == m.Groups[7].Value)
        { /* WHERE == HAVING */
            Console.WriteLine("Same");
            return string.Concat(m.Groups[1].Value, m.Groups[9].Value);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Not Same");
        return m.Groups[0].Value;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // For the example :
        StringBuilder procedure = new StringBuilder();
        procedure.Append(@"
SELECT columnA, columnB, COUNT(*) AS "COUNT" INTO temporaryTable
FROM tableA
WHERE columnA = "A"
  AND ISNULL(columnB, "B") = "B"
GROUP BY columnA, columnB
HAVING columnA = "A"
  AND ISNULL(columnB, "B") = "B"
SELECT * FROM temporaryTable -- There is not necessary to have an empty line between two instructions.");

        Regex reg = new Regex(@"((.*)where(.*)([\s^]+)group\s*by(.*)([\s^]+))having(.*)([\s^]+(SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE))",
            RegexOptions.Compiled |
            RegexOptions.IgnoreCase |
            RegexOptions.Multiline);

        string newProcedure = reg.Replace(procedure, (MatchEvaluator)RemoveHaving);
        Console.WriteLine("---");
        Console.WriteLine(newProcedure);
        Console.WriteLine("---");
    }

It works but not seems to be the best way... Question too is : how to detect safely the end of the HAVING ?

How would you manage this work?

Thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure this isn't more trouble than it's worth? That's my first thought on this. –  Justin Morgan Apr 12 '11 at 18:12
    
This is obviously not the real example and although you have explained what you are trying to do you haven't explained the problem you are trying to solve so it is not very easy to give you constructive help here. –  Andrew Apr 12 '11 at 18:15
    
Just a hint on how your where clause is constructed. The way you have used the ISNULL function could hurt the query performance as SQL Server can't use an index on this in an effective way. Your where clause should be WHERE columnA="A" AND (columnB="B" OR columnB IS NULL) –  Andrew Apr 12 '11 at 18:18
    
@Justin: no, this causes a lot of (performance) problems and I want to remove it. –  Arnaud F. Apr 12 '11 at 18:21
    
@Andrew: As said, I want to remove all having clauses that are identical to the where one. For the ISNULL, it's only an example (and I'm not using MS-SQL Server ;)) –  Arnaud F. Apr 12 '11 at 18:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First thought is this:

string pattern = @"WHERE\s+([\s\S]*?)\s+HAVING\s+\1\s+(SELECT|$)";
string output = Regex.Replace(input, pattern, @"WHERE $1 SELECT");

However, this will only work if the statement is immediately followed by the SELECT keyword or an end-of-line. Different use of whitespace in the conditionals will also throw it off, as will reordering of subclauses. If you want something that's going to do this in a robust way, it's going to be VERY complicated without some kind of specialized SQL parser/optimizer.

share|improve this answer
    
In 99% of all procedures I need to parse (>6,000 procedures), the having clause is a copy/paste of the where clause, so I think this will do easily the biggest part of the job ! :) –  Arnaud F. Apr 12 '11 at 18:32
    
Hum, can you just explain this part : ([\s\S]*?) ? Thanks –  Arnaud F. Apr 12 '11 at 18:35
1  
@Arnaud - The [\s\S] is similar to ., except that it will also match carriage returns. The *? quantifier means (roughly) that it can match any number of characters but will stop as soon as it reaches the next HAVING keyword. For more info, check out regular-expressions.info. Hope that helps. –  Justin Morgan Apr 12 '11 at 18:39

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