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I have two tables:

TableA: (a temporary table)
ItemId (int)

TableB:
ItemId (int), ParentID (int)

I want to retrieve all items in Table A where the ParentID of any of the items in Table A doesn't exist as an ItemID. (i.e. I want to get the root of the items in TableA)

This query does what I want:

SELECT a.ItemID
FROM TableA a
INNER JOIN TableB b ON a.ItemId = b.ItemID
WHERE b.ParentID NOT IN ( SELECT * from TableA ) 

as does this one:

SELECT b.ItemID 
FROM TableB b
WHERE b.ItemID IN ( SELECT * FROM TableA)
AND b.ParentID NOT IN ( SELECT * FROM TableA )

I am not satisfied with either of the queries, particularly because of the use of NOT IN/IN. Is there a way to do this without them? Perhaps a cleaner way that doesn't require subqueries?

Sample Data:

Table A
-------
2
3
5
6

Table B
--------
1 | NULL
2 | 1
3 | 1
4 | 3
5 | 3
6 | 3

Desired Result:

2
3

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you are against these subqueries? They should run faster than a LEFT JOIN in this instance. –  JNK Apr 12 '11 at 18:17
    
Well, I definitely don't like to have to repeat by subqueries...it just seems odd to do that. Having said that, I just assumed that they were bad because...that's what...I've...read...everywhere.... –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:20
    
Can you perhaps explain why it'll be faster in this instance / and not others? –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:20
2  
For a subquery, using IN or EXISTS calculates the subquery once and short circuits. For a LEFT JOIN you return the whole result set in the JOINed table then filter out. IN can be slower if you use specific values or a set, but for a subquery the exec plan is normally the same as as EXISTS subquery, which short circuits. –  JNK Apr 12 '11 at 18:22
    
what about NOT IN? –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without subqueries:

SELECT ItemID
  FROM TableA
INTERSECT 
SELECT b.ItemID
  FROM TableB AS b
       LEFT OUTER JOIN TableA AS a
          ON b.ParentID = a.ItemID
 WHERE a.ItemID IS NULL;

...but is your fear of subqueries rational? :) I'd find this equivalent query easier to read and understand:

SELECT ItemID
  FROM TableA
INTERSECT 
SELECT ItemID
  FROM TableB
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                   SELECT * 
                     FROM TableA AS a
                    WHERE a.ItemID = TableB.ParentID
                  );
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :) It is an irrational fear, I think :) –  Swati Apr 13 '11 at 15:05
    
The one fear I have with in (subquery) is the limitation of the number of results you can have in the in clause. In fact I recently ran into that error stating I could only have a max of 2100 id's in my in clause on sql server 2008 r2 express. –  goku_da_master Nov 14 '12 at 16:12
    
@goku_da_master: sounds like you are not actually using IN ( <table expression, could be a subquery> ) but rather IN (<comma separated list>) or perhaps IN (<table constructor>) -- every parser has its limits! –  onedaywhen Nov 19 '12 at 8:36

Take a look at Select all rows from one table that don't exist in another table to see 5 different ways to do this kind of query by using

NOT IN
NOT EXISTS
LEFT and RIGHT JOIN
OUTER APPLY (2005+)
EXCEPT (2005+)

Here is a script that you can run

CREATE TABLE #TableA( ItemId int)

INSERT #TableA values(1)
INSERT #TableA values(2)
INSERT #TableA values(3) 
INSERT #TableA values(4)
INSERT #TableA values(5)
INSERT #TableA values(6) 


CREATE TABLE #TableB( ItemId int, ParentID int)
INSERT #TableB values(1,1)
INSERT #TableB values(2,2)
INSERT #TableB values(4,3)
INSERT #TableB values(5,4)

this will do it for parent

SELECT a.ItemID
FROM #TableA a
LEFT JOIN #TableB b ON a.ItemId = b.ParentID
WHERE b.ItemID IS NULL

SELECT a.ItemID
FROM #TableA a
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM #TableB b WHERE a.ItemId = b.ParentID)

Output

ItemID
5
6
share|improve this answer
    
That gives me a nullset. ALL items have parents, so I am not sure if it'll ever be null. –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:19
    
None of those work for me. I don't believe that the linked question applies - I DO need records which exist in both tables BUT where the ParentID (in TableB) is not an ItemID in TableA –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:24
    
Run the code I added –  SQLMenace Apr 12 '11 at 18:26
    
That's an invalid data set for me. ALL the ItemIDs in Table A exist in Table B as ItemIDs as well. (Table A is a subset of Table B, if you will). TableB also stores ParentIDs, all of which are also valid ItemIDs. –  Swati Apr 12 '11 at 18:29
2  
-1 Using the OP's data, your queries do not yield the OP's Desired Result. –  onedaywhen Apr 13 '11 at 8:03

You can use outer joins. Something like this:

SELECT a.ItemID
FROM TableA a
INNER JOIN TableB b ON a.ItemId = b.ItemID
LEFT JOIN TableB parentB on a.ItemID = parentB.ParentID 
WHERE parentB.ParentID IS NULL 
share|improve this answer

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