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I want to move an IMAP message from INBOX to INBOX/Archive using python's imapclient library, which I'm doing basically like this:

def archive_message(imap, message_id):
    imap.copy([message_id], getOptions().imap_archive_folder)
    imap.delete_messages([message_id])

However, this loses my reference to the message. What I want to do is to store an identifier for the message that will allow me to look up the message later, using something like this:

def retrieve_message(imap, MYSTICAL_STORED_ID):
    imap.select_folder(getOptions().imap_archive_folder)
    return imap.fetch([MYSTICAL_STORED_ID], parts=["RFC822"])

What ID should I / can I use for this, and how would I do the lookup part of this?

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In most cases, the server will support the UIDPLUS extension and thus the new UID of the copy in the remote folder is part of the return value from your call to imap.copy. –  dkarp Apr 13 '11 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The value in the Message-Id header is supposed to be unique per email message.

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So, assuming I've SELECTed a folder, this is sufficient to identify the message for retrieval? –  Chris R Apr 12 '11 at 20:00
    
You may need to scan the folder for the appropriate message and get its index; I don't actually know IMAP all that well. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 12 '11 at 20:02
    
The problem is that you can have multiple copies of a single message in a folder. (See that imap.copy? You don't have to follow it with an imap.delete_messages...) –  dkarp Apr 13 '11 at 18:27
    
Sure, but that's just multiple instances of the same message, and the Message-Id can be used to weed them out. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 13 '11 at 19:26

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