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Code:

$data = array("vanilla", "strawberry", "mango", "peaches");
print_r(array_slice($data, 1, 2));


Output:
Array
(
[0] => strawberry
[1] => mango
)

in my case :

$data = array("vanilla", "strawberry", "mango", "peaches");
$sub_set_data = array( "strawberry", "mango");

the Output will be the remain array: array("vanilla", "peaches");

EDIT:

NOT array diff it look like the minus operator 7-3 = 4 or $C = $A-$B

python concept:

>>> A           = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]
>>> subset_of_A  = [6, 9, 12];
>>> set(A) - set(subset_of_A)
set([8, 10, 11, 7])
>>> 

How Can I do for this case?

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It is not clear what you are asking for, because array_diff seemingly works for your example. –  Matthew Apr 12 '11 at 20:19
    
I updated questions.concept's python –  soksan Apr 12 '11 at 20:20
    
@IEnAk, have you tried array_diff? I think it does exactly what you want: returns everything in A that isn't in subset of A. –  Matthew Apr 12 '11 at 20:22
    
acceptable,but for my case $sub_set_data its elements are the subset of $data . All of $sub_set_data in $data. –  soksan Apr 12 '11 at 20:26
    
@IEnAk: There is no "minus" operator for sets, but the difference of two sets (here represented by array_diff() on two arrays) is exactly what you are looking for. If not, you should describe whats the matter with that. –  KingCrunch Apr 12 '11 at 20:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like you need array_diff

<?php
$array1 = array("a" => "green", "red", "blue", "red");
$array2 = array("b" => "green", "yellow", "red");
$result = array_diff($array1, $array2);

print_r($result);
?>

Result:

Array
(
    [1] => blue
)

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.array-diff.php

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