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So i'm trying to avoid using vectors to do this, i know it would make it easier, but i'm trying to better my understanding of pointers and arrays. So is there a way to expand and shift an array without using the vectors? Here is what i have so far:

int *expand(int *&arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;

    size = size * 2; 

    newArray = new int[size * 2];
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
        newArray[index] = arr[index];
    return newArray;

}
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Hi, you need to indent all code with 4 spaces, so that it will show up properly in the question :) –  x10 Apr 12 '11 at 20:09
    
I don't see any vectors in there?? –  Pete Apr 12 '11 at 20:10
1  
You are allocating 4 times the size, is this what you wanted? –  Thomas Matthews Apr 12 '11 at 20:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you aren't changing the value of arr inside the function, there's no need to pass the address by reference. If you did mean to change the value, you need to add a new line of code before the return newArray:

arr = newArray;

If the typical calling pattern is

arr = expand(arr, arr_size);

then you'll also need to watch out for options that ignore aliasing. And you'll have to make assumptions within expand that size is always doubled, and keep track of that yourself outside of it.

Also, your code has a terrible bug. size is doubled, and then used as the array limit for the source array. Then it leaks the memory that was previously allocated for arr. This is a good reason why people use std::vector. :-) Most of the bugs are out of that library, by now.

void expand_in_place(int *&arr, int& size)
{
    const new_size = size * 2;
    int *new_array = new int[new_size];

    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
        new_array[index] = arr[index];

    delete[] arr;
    arr = newArray;
    size = new_size;
}

If you were using malloc and free instead of new [] and delete [], you could use realloc.

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The simplest way to do what you want would be the standard library function realloc.
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/realloc/

int* new_array = (int*) realloc (old_array, new_size * sizeof(int));

Note the *sizeof(int). That's important :)
realloc makes sure the contents of *old_array* can be found in *new_array*(it's either the same pointer, or the contents are copied). See the link for details.

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4  
Note, then, that the realloc'd memory cannot be acquired by new, and cannot be free'd with delete. This is very C-ish, doesn't call constructors, etc. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '11 at 20:14
1  
Precisely. If you wanted it to be C++-ish, you would use vectors :) –  x10 Apr 12 '11 at 20:19
    
@x10: Well not really, vector does need to be implemented somehow, and it doesn't use realloc. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '11 at 20:22
    
Ah, I understand what you mean. Well, he could allocate new memory, std::copy the contents, deallocate the old memory, set the pointer reference to the new value and return it. But a standard library call is easier :) –  x10 Apr 12 '11 at 20:27
    
@x10: But like I said, it's not an equal choice; this is now dependent on C allocation functions instead of C++ allocation expressions. –  GManNickG Apr 12 '11 at 20:33

In c++, try to avoid raw pointers. But since this is an exercise, this is a c++ way :

int *expand(int *&arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray = new int[2*size];

    std::copy( &arr[0],&arr[size], &newArray[0] );
    // delete [] arr; // need to delete?

    return newArray;
}

To do in place :

void expand(int *&arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray = new int[2*size];

    std::copy( &arr[0],&arr[size], &newArray[0] );
    delete [] arr;

    arr = newArray;
}
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Maybe the int*& arr should just be an int* arr in this case? –  x10 Apr 12 '11 at 20:28
    
@x10 See edit how to do it in place. No need to return anything –  BЈовић Apr 13 '11 at 6:26

To do it manually, you need to copy the old data with the size of the original array, right now you're walking off the end of the original array.

Try this:

int *expand(int *&arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;

    newArray = new int[size * 2];
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
        newArray[index] = arr[index];
    return newArray;
}
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  • You're allocating twice as much memory as you need.
  • You're not deleting the old array.
  • You're not assigning the new pointer to arr - passing it as reference indicates that's what you intended - or that you intended to delete[] arr and assign 0 to it.
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So what if i wanted to initialized the new space in the array with elements, for example if i print out the new array the new spaces in the array have numbers in them? –  Shimar Apr 13 '11 at 4:32
    
@Smar: Keep the loop initializing it –  Erik Apr 13 '11 at 5:03

See this link for a method that uses memcpy instead of looping through individual items.

int *expand(int *&arr, int size)
{
    size_t newSize = size * 2;
    int* newArr = new int[newSize];

    memcpy( newArr, arr, size * sizeof(int) );

    size = newSize;
    delete [] arr;
    arr = newArr;
}
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memcpy also doesn't care about constructor/destructors –  BЈовић Apr 12 '11 at 20:17
    
he's got an array of integers, does that matter? –  mjmarsh Apr 12 '11 at 20:17
    
In that case - no. Generally speaking - it matters –  BЈовић Apr 12 '11 at 20:19

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