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Are there any differences between...

if ($value) {

}

...and...

if ($value):

endif;

?

share|improve this question
    
The second way has been there since PHP4, if not earlier. –  Miles Feb 19 '09 at 6:24
    
see also: stackoverflow.com/questions/381259/… –  Jacco Feb 19 '09 at 11:50

17 Answers 17

up vote 92 down vote accepted

They are the same but the second one is great if you have MVC in your code and don't want to have a lot of echos in your code. For example, in my .phtml files (Zend Framework) I will write something like this:

<?php if($this->value): ?>
Hello
<?php elseif($this->asd): ?>
Your name is: <?= $this->name ?>
<?php else: ?>
You don't have a name.
<?php endif; ?>
share|improve this answer
55  
Won't that work with curly brackets too? –  alex Feb 19 '09 at 6:16
21  
@alex It will work with curly brackets as well, but at least personally I find this way kind of clearer in things like this. Cause they you know that it is the end of an if, and not the end of a loop of some sort or something else. Think you have endfor and endwhile or something similar too. –  Svish Jun 15 '09 at 7:16
7  
I wouldn't use the <?= ?> because it is not supported on all servers, especially shared hosting ones that don't allow you to change php.ini. –  Siqi Lin Aug 1 '10 at 18:57
2  
The pertinent point is <?php endif; ?> - you can tell exactly what is ending even with many lines of HTML inbetween the preceding if / else and this statement. –  Steve Fenton Feb 23 '11 at 14:21
2  
I dun see using alternative syntax in your example help to reduce number of echoes. –  ajreal Feb 23 '12 at 7:17

I personally really hate the alternate syntax. One nice thing about the braces is that most IDEs, vim, etc all have bracket highlighting. In my text editor I can double click a brace and it will highlight the whole chunk so I can see where it ends and begins very easily.

I don't know of a single editor that can highlight endif, endforeach, etc.

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9  
This is supposed to be used in PHP templates, where beginning and end of block are separated by chunk of foreign language. If your IDE understands PHP well enough to parse that, it should also highlight endif as end-of-block properly. If it doesn't, you don't really buy anything by using } as it won't match anyway. –  Pavel Minaev Jul 16 '09 at 4:50
2  
Most ide's (at least the ones I have used) only highlight { } –  AntonioCS Feb 18 '11 at 10:46
7  
Netbeans 7.x happily highlights matching endforeach, endif, etc –  Jonathan Day Sep 7 '12 at 5:52
    
@Mr. Minaev: The brace matcher will parse correctly probably in 98% of cases, even there is foreign code inside it. It will only fail when there is an ezoteric brace "openning but not closing code" inside it. Yes, it happens, but it just happens rarely. Why to you think that a complex "end-whatever;" parser approach will do better practically, than the simple solution? –  PatlaDJ Dec 22 '12 at 12:43
1  
PHPStorm works properly with both syntax –  Mauro May 8 '13 at 15:11

I think this say it all:

this alternative syntax is excellent for improving legibility (for both PHP and HTML!) in situations where you have a mix of them.

http://ca3.php.net/manual/en/control-structures.alternative-syntax.php

When mixing HTML an PHP the alternative sytnax is much easier to read. In normal PHP documents the traditional syntax should be used.

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2  
+1, Nice answer on what its purpose is. Personally I think it's a pointless addition to an already cluttered language. –  Draemon Jan 20 '10 at 20:18

At our company, the preferred way for handling HTML is:

<? if($condition) { ?>
   HTML content here
<? } else { ?>
   Other HTML content here
<? } ?>

In the end, it really is a matter of choosing one and sticking with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, it was a bad example. I have updated it. –  alex Feb 19 '09 at 6:19
    
Thanks -- I updated this answer. It beats around the bush a little, but may help out. –  gahooa Feb 19 '09 at 6:20
    
Who do you mean when you say "our"? –  Oddthinking Feb 19 '09 at 6:22
1  
@Oddthinking: The company he works for I assume? –  alex Feb 19 '09 at 6:27
    
+1 for avoiding excessive echo statements and escaped quote marks. :) –  John McCollum Feb 20 '09 at 12:36

Here's where you can find it in the official documentation: PHP: Alternative syntax for control structures

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Both are the same.

But: If you want to use PHP as your templating language in your view files(the V of MVC) you can use this alternate syntax to distinguish between php code written to implement business-logic (Controller and Model parts of MVC) and gui-logic. Of course it is not mandatory and you can use what ever syntax you like.

ZF uses that approach.

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I think that it really depends on your personal coding style. If you're used to C++, Javascript, etc., you might feel more comfortable using the {} syntax. If you're used to Visual Basic, you might want to use the if : endif; syntax.

I'm not sure one can definitively say one is easier to read than the other - it's personal preference. I usually do something like this:

<?php
if ($foo) { ?>
   <p>Foo!</p><?php
} else { ?>
   <p>Bar!</p><?php
}  // if-else ($foo) ?>

Whether that's easier to read than:

<?php
if ($foo): ?>
   <p>Foo!</p><?php
else: ?>
   <p>Bar!</p><?php
endif; ?>

is a matter of opinion. I can see why some would feel the 2nd way is easier - but only if you haven't been programming in Javascript and C++ all your life. :)

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I would use the first option if at all possible, regardless of the new option. The syntax is standard and everyone knows it. It's also backwards compatible.

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There is no technical difference between the two syntaxes. The alternative syntax is not new; it was supported at least as far back as PHP 4, and perhaps even earlier.

You might prefer the alternative form because it explicitly states which control structure is ending: endwhile, for example, can only terminate a while block, whereas if you encounter a brace, it could be closing anything.

You might prefer the traditional syntax, though, if you use an editor that has special support for braces in other C-like syntaxes. Vim, for example, supports several keystrokes for navigating to matching braces and to the starts and ends of brace-delimited blocks. The alternative syntax would break that editor feature.

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They are indeed both the same, functionally.

But if the endif is getting to far from the if I think it's much better practice to give a comment to it. No matter what language it is:

if (my_coat_is_blue) {

    // ...
    // let's pretend this is a lot of code in the middle
    foreach (day in week) {
        sing(a_different_song[day]);
    }
    // ...

} //if my_coat_is_blue
share|improve this answer

I used to use the curly braces but now a days I prefer to use this short-hand alternative syntax because of code readability and accessibility.

share|improve this answer
    
I use it in my view templates. –  alex Jul 16 '09 at 5:23

In the end you just don't want to be looking for the following line and then having to guess where it started:

<?php } ?>

Technically and functionally they are the same.

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It all depends, personally I prefer the traditional syntax with echos and plenty of indentations, since it's just so much easier to read.

<?php
    if($something){
        doThis();
    }else{
        echo '<h1>Title</h1>
            <p>This is a paragraph</p>
            <p>and another paragraph</p>';
    }
?>

I agree alt syntax is cleaner with the different end clauses, but I really have a hard time dealing with them without help from text-editor highlighting, and I'm just not used to seeing "condensed" code like this:

<?php if( $this->isEnabledViewSwitcher() ): ?>
<p class="view-mode">
    <?php $_modes = $this->getModes(); ?>
    <?php if($_modes && count($_modes)>1): ?>
    <label><?php echo $this->__('View as') ?>:</label>
    <?php foreach ($this->getModes() as $_code=>$_label): ?>
        <?php if($this->isModeActive($_code)): ?>
            <strong title="<?php echo $_label ?>" class="<?php echo strtolower($_code); ?>"><?php echo $_label ?></strong>&nbsp;
        <?php else: ?>
            <a href="<?php echo $this->getModeUrl($_code) ?>" title="<?php echo $_label ?>" class="<?php echo strtolower($_code); ?>"><?php echo $_label ?></a>&nbsp;
        <?php endif; ?>
    <?php endforeach; ?>
    <?php endif; ?>
</p>
<?php endif; ?>
share|improve this answer

I think that it's particularly clearer when you're using a mix of ifs, fors and foreaches in view scripts:

<?php if ( $this->hasIterable ): ?>
    <h2>Iterable</h2>
    <ul>
    <?php foreach ( $this->iterable as $key => $val ):?>
        <?php for ( $i = 0; $i <= $val; $i++ ): ?>
        <li><?php echo $key ?></li>
        <?php endfor; ?>
    <?php endforeach; ?>
    </ul>
<?php elseif ( $this->hasScalar ): ?>
    <h2>Scalar</h2>
    <?php for ( $i = 0; $i <= $this->scalar; $i++ ): ?>
    <p>Foo = Bar</p>
    <?php endfor; ?>
<?php else: ?>
    <h2>Other</h2>
    <?php if ( $this->otherVal === true ): ?>
    <p>Spam</p>
    <?php else: ?>  
    <p>Eggs</p>  
    <?php endif; ?>
<?php endif; ?>

as opposed to:

<?php if ( $this->hasIterable ){ ?>
    <h2>Iterable</h2>
    <ul>
    <?php foreach ( $this->iterable as $key => $val ){?>
        <?php for ( $i = 0; $i <= $val; $i++ ){ ?>
        <li><?php echo $key ?></li>
        <?php } ?>
    <?php } ?>
    </ul>
<?php } elseif ( $this->hasScalar ){ ?>
    <h2>Scalar</h2>
    <?php for ( $i = 0; $i <= $this->scalar; $i++ ){ ?>
    <p>Foo = Bar</p>
    <?php } ?>
<?php } else { ?>
    <h2>Other</h2>
    <?php if ( $this->otherVal === true ){ ?>
    <p>Spam</p>
    <?php } else { ?>  
    <p>Eggs</p>  
    <?php } ?>
<?php } ?>

This is especially useful for long control statements where you might not be able to see the top declaration from the bottom brace.

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I used to use curly brackets for "if, else" conditions. However, I found "if(xxx): endif;" is more semantic if the code is heavily wrapped and easier to read in any editors.

Of course, lots editors are capable of recognise and highlight chunks of code when curly brackets are selected. Some also do well on "if(xxx): endif" pair (eg, NetBeans)

Personally, I would recommend "if(xxx): endif", but for small condition check (eg, only one line of code), there are not much differences.

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Personally I prefer making it in two seperate sections but within the same PHP like:

<?php 
          if(question1) { $variable_1=somehtml; }
 else{    $variable_1=someotherhtml; 
} 
if(question2) {
 $variable_2=somehtml2;

 }

   else{ 
$variable_2=someotherhtml2; 

}


etc.
$output=<<<HERE
htmlhtmlhtml$variable1htmlhtmlhtml$varianble2htmletcetcetc
HERE;
echo $output;

?>

But maybe it is slower?

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I think it's a matter of preference. I personally use:

if($something){
       $execute_something;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
if you'd read the whole thread: alternative syntax is preffered and much <em>cleaner</em> when templating or using foreign language in php views –  Juraj Blahunka Jan 20 '10 at 20:38

protected by alex Oct 9 '13 at 16:40

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