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I have a library of functions contained in a delphi unit which we shall call UtilitiesU. Some of these functions are just helper functions that are only used inside UtilitiesU. I would like to limit the scope of these functions to UtilitiesU. These are the methods that I know of for doing this:

  1. Remove the declaration from the interface and move the function before its dependents in the implementation - messy, counter-intuitive order of function definitions, not always possible if there is e.g. mutual dependency
  2. Put all the functions into a static class (ala Java) and make them public or private as appropriate - too much boilerplate, convoluted
  3. Declare the helper functions local to the functions in which they are used - same problems as point 1

Ideally, I would like to do it the C/C++ way - that is, declare them as static in the implementation section. Is this possible? Is there a better way?

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Why don't you put these "private helper functions" into their own unit, and just DON'T use them anywhere else, but inside the unit that needs to call them. I really don't see a value in making these utility functions ONLY visible to the inside of utilitiesU? This seems to be a makework project. –  Warren P Apr 13 '11 at 1:11
    
Thats is what I wrote in my solution 2. I think it is a good idea. But if somebody "uses" this helper unit, he/she will get access to all functions. Maybe thats not what he wants. –  Rafael Colucci Apr 13 '11 at 1:15
1  
please don't mark the first answer you see as "the answer", give it at least a couple of hours to see what comes out. Forward declaration is the obvious answer IMO, but you marked Rafael's one correct very quickly and missed it. –  Мסž Apr 13 '11 at 5:58
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would do:

Remove the declaration from the interface and move the function before its dependents in the implementation - messy, counter-intuitive order of function definitions, not always possible if there is e.g. mutual dependency

Btw, theres not way of declaring a static class in delphi as you do in other languages. Only var and methods can be static, not the entire class.

There are other 3 ways

1 - You can create a class an put all the helper code on it on its private section (maybe statics methods) and use it inside the UtilitiesU unit. Bu I would not go for it, the 1 method you wrote is the best, I think.

2 - You can separe all your helper code in another unit, lest call it UtilitiesHelper.

3 - You can mix 1 and 2, but using protected methods. Then you can easily hack the helper class in your UtilitiesU unit. Example:

In the UtilitiesHelper unit

TUtilitiesHelper = class
protected
   //all your methods here
end;

In the UtilitiesU unit

TUtilitiesHelperHack = class(TUtilitiesHelper)
end;

With that you can access protected methods. But I dont recommend it also.

EDIT

As Ken said, you can use:

implementation

procedure ShowMe;forward;

I just tested this myself and it worked. (thats new to me also, thanks Ken).

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"You can declare its header in the beginning of the implementation section." are you sure? I tried this and received the following compile error: 'BEGIN expected but END found'. As for static class, i meant to say have a normal class with static methods only –  Nicholas Grasevski Apr 13 '11 at 0:59
    
Sorry, i messed up. I was thinking on c when i wrote it. –  Rafael Colucci Apr 13 '11 at 1:02
    
"As for static class, i meant to say have a normal class with static methods only". Ok, thats is possible but I would go for the first solution. If you have dependencies between functions you might have a not good code. In this case you should consider refactoring the dependent functions into a new function. –  Rafael Colucci Apr 13 '11 at 1:10
    
If you think solution 1 is not good for you, i would go for "2 - You can separe all your helper code in another unit, lest call it UtilitiesHelper." –  Rafael Colucci Apr 13 '11 at 1:11
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You can still declare your functions like this:

implementation

procedure ShowMe;forward;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  ShowMe;
end;

procedure showMe;
begin
  ShowMessage('Hello');
end;

So you can put all your function right after the implementation in the order you want. Declare them forward, and define them further down anywhere you want.

Personnally, I kindda prefer declaring those method as class methods. (Lets call it, "name space friendly"). But end result is pretty much the same.

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1  
Wow, thats new to me. I did not know the forward thing. Are you sure it is not deprecated? –  Rafael Colucci Apr 13 '11 at 1:22
    
forward is from Wirth-era Pascal, where there was no interface and implementation sections. –  Gerry Coll Apr 13 '11 at 2:00
    
@Rafael, Forward definitely is still supported. The Delphi RTL requires it for some of its declarations, particularly the low-level stuff. –  John Kaster Apr 13 '11 at 4:16
8  
Forcing first class functions into a class isn't "namespace friendly" it's just OO fetishism. Delphi is already "namespace friendly" in every respect relevant to this question. The issue is how to declare something before it is implemented in order to make it referenceable in other things that are implemented before them. The language provides the primitive needed to accomplish this very straightforwardly without calling into existence needless pseudo-containers - something that other languages do by necessity as a result of their OO fixation. In Delphi, just do it the Delphi way. forward –  Deltics Apr 13 '11 at 6:33
3  
@deltics in what sense is Delphi namespace friendly? In large projects it is common to need to be careful about the order of uses clauses and to have to use fully specified names. On many occasions I've fallen foul of changes in one unit making a completely unrelated piece of code in another unit fail because suddenly a different function is used due to the lack of fine grained namespaces. Static class methods provide exactly that. –  David Heffernan Apr 13 '11 at 7:11
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