Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

is there any library that can give me XPATH for all the nodes in HTML page ?

share|improve this question
    
Which language are you using? –  samplebias Apr 13 '11 at 1:06
1  
//node() is the Xpath for all of the nodes. –  Steven D. Majewski Apr 13 '11 at 1:40
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for an exhaustive solution. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 13 '11 at 4:25
    
@samplebias : JAVA would be better. but I don't mind even if It's PHP or Perl. –  user583726 Apr 13 '11 at 18:33
2  
@Steven D. Majewski: No. It isn't. –  user357812 Apr 14 '11 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

is there any library that can give me XPATH for all the nodes in HTML page

Yes, if this HTML page is a well-formed XML document.

Depending on what you understand by "node"...

//*

selects all the elements in the document.

/descendant-or-self::node()

selects all elements, text nodes, processing instructions, comment nodes, and the root node /.

//text()

selects all text nodes in the document.

//comment()

selects all comment nodes in the document.

//processing-instruction()

selects all processing instructions in the document.

//@* 

selects all attribute nodes in the document.

//namespace::*

selects all namespace nodes in the document.

Finally, you can combine any of the above expressions using the union (|) operator.

Thus, I believe that the following expression really selects "all the nodes" of any XML document:

/descendant-or-self::node() | //@* | //namespace::*
share|improve this answer
2  
//node() does not select the root because it's expanded to /descendant-or-self::node()/child::node(). In fact node() pattern doesn't match the document root. –  user357812 Apr 14 '11 at 19:13
    
@Alejandro: Good catch, fixed. As for selecting the document root, it still matches node() as in ancestor::node() or self::node() –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 14 '11 at 22:34
    
Sorry, I should said "node() as a pattern". –  user357812 Apr 14 '11 at 22:41
    
+1 Complete answer. –  user357812 Apr 14 '11 at 22:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.