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I'm really not sure how to even phrase the question. So I'll go by example. I currently use this SQL command to get a total of all sales:

SELECT sum(ot.value*o.currency_value)
  FROM orders_total ot
  LEFT JOIN orders o on o.orders_id = ot.orders_id
 WHERE ot.class = 'ot_total'
   AND o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31'

And that works fine, but now I want to do a report that cross-references the above with a 3rd table (orders_products) to sum up only the orders containing a specific product id. So I tried this:

SELECT sum(ot.value*o.currency_value)
  FROM orders_total ot
 (LEFT JOIN orders o on o.orders_id = ot.orders_id)
  LEFT JOIN orders_products op on ot.orders_id = op.orders_id
 WHERE ot.class = 'ot_total'
   AND o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31'
   AND op.products_id = 321

But that gives me a higher-than-expected total. Investigating manually, I discovered the obvious reason is that any given order can (of course) have more than one product.

I'd like to show an example but I can't do tables here it seems.

Q: How do I sum up a total value without getting duplicate records from orders matching multiple entries in the op table?

Does that make any sense at all?

Edit:

I feel like I'm sort of onto something with this:

SELECT distinct o.orders_id
  FROM orders o
  JOIN orders_products op on o.orders_id = op.orders_id
 WHERE o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31'
   AND op.products_id = 321

That results in a listing of all orders_id represented by the product in question. So now I need to sort of inject that result into another statement summing up the values? But how??

Edit:

Here's an attempt to show my tables:

orders_total

orders_total_id orders_id class      value 
--------------- --------- ---------- -------
    1                 1   ot_sub       100
    2                 1   ot_shipping  10
    3                 1   ot_total     110
    4                 2   ot_sub       200
    5                 2   ot_shipping  10
    6                 2   ot_total     210
    7                 3   ot_sub       50
    8                 3   ot_shipping  5
    9                 3   ot_sub       55

orders

orders_id    currency_value    date_purchased
---------    --------------    --------------
   1              1.0000         2010-04-20
   2              1.0000         2010-05-05
   3              1.0000         2010-06-01

orders_products

orders_products_id    orders_id    products_id
------------------    ---------    -----------
    1                     1            321
    2                     2            555
    3                     2            132
    4                     2            321
    5                     3            132

So I want an SQL statement that will give me a result of 320 (total of all orders containing product ID 321, which is orders 1 and 2 but not 3; "value" of "ot_total" for 1 is 110 and for 2 is 210. 110 + 210 = 320).

EDIT/SOLUTION:

Thanks to JNK for turning me on to EXISTS. As it turns out, this did the job nicely:

SELECT sum(ot.value*o.currency_value) FROM orders_total ot LEFT JOIN orders o ON o.orders_id = ot.orders_id WHERE EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM orders_products op WHERE op.products_id = 321 AND op.orders_id = o.orders_id) and o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31' and ot.class = 'ot_total'
share|improve this question
    
We'll definitely need to see the DDL/diagram/definitions for those tables. What do you mean by "can't do tables here..."? I would suggest a quick look through other SQL questions for examples of table definitions and data samples formating. –  Paul Sasik Apr 13 '11 at 1:11
    
ok, I see others using tables but I don't see how to do it. I'll figure something out and edit –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 1:16
    
Here's an exmaple: stackoverflow.com/questions/5643370/sql-query-for-month-wise/… It has one table instead of three. The formatting is just code. Enter some data, select it and then click the {} icon for code formatting. You can align it from there. –  Paul Sasik Apr 13 '11 at 1:22
    
OK, did my best –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 1:32
    
Order 2 has 3 items that total 210. Where are the details to what each product cost? –  JBrooks Apr 13 '11 at 1:35
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use EXISTS - this is a perfect use case.

SELECT <all your fields>
FROM table
LEFT JOIN orders o
   ON table2.key = table.key
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT NULL
              FROM orders_products op
              WHERE op.products_id = xxx
              AND op.orderid = o.orderid)

This will do a short-circuit comparison on the subquery. If the row in the outer query matches, it gets included. If not, it's not in the final result set.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks promising, thanks! I'll play with it. –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 1:35
1  
EXISTS is underrated. I love this implementation. Don't forget to alias/name the original table. –  JClaspill Apr 13 '11 at 1:42
    
That's a correlated sub-query. Unless the optimizer spots that it is and manages to rewrite the query to use a non-correlated sub-query, it is an expensive way of doing things. Also, with EXISTS, it is convention to use 'SELECT *' and it is not costly (or, if it is, get a better DBMS); the optimizer doesn't materialize the rows so the '*' really doesn't matter. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '11 at 2:36
    
So how do you stop double counting for products that are in the same order? –  JBrooks Apr 13 '11 at 3:33
    
Thanks! EXISTS works. I'm going to edit my question to include the solution. –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 5:10
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Do it step by step, and don't use left outer join unless you really need to - you don't here.

  1. List the orders which included product 321:

    SELECT DISTINCT Orders_ID
      FROM Orders_Products
     WHERE Products_ID = 321
    
  2. List the component data for each relevant order:

    SELECT OT.Orders_ID, OT.Value, O.Currency_Value
      FROM Orders_Total AS OT
      JOIN Orders       AS O  ON OT.Orders_ID = O.Orders_ID
     WHERE O.Orders_ID IN
               (SELECT DISTINCT Orders_ID
                  FROM Orders_Products
                 WHERE Products_ID = 321
               )
       AND OT.Class = 'ot_total'
       AND O.Date_Purchased BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-12-31'
    
  3. Do the summation you want.

    SELECT SUM(OT.Value * O.Currency_Value) AS TotalOrderValue
      FROM Orders_Total AS OT
      JOIN Orders       AS O  ON OT.Orders_ID = O.Orders_ID
     WHERE O.Orders_ID IN
               (SELECT DISTINCT Orders_ID
                  FROM Orders_Products
                 WHERE Products_ID = 321
               )
       AND OT.Class = 'ot_total'
       AND O.Date_Purchased BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-12-31'
    

There are other ways to write it - there almost always are many ways to write a query in SQL. The DISTINCT is not really necessary in the sub-query.

As long as each order only has a single row in Orders_Products for any given Products_ID and you are only interested in the orders for a single part (not a list of parts), then you can modify the SQL into a more direct triple-join instead of using the sub-select:

SELECT SUM(OT.Value * O.Currency_Value) AS TotalOrderValue
  FROM Orders_Total    AS OT
  JOIN Orders          AS O  ON OT.Orders_ID = O.Orders_ID
  JOIN Orders_Products AS OP ON OP.Orders_ID = O.Orders_ID
 WHERE OP.Products_ID = 321
   AND OT.Class = 'ot_total'
   AND O.Date_Purchased BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-12-31'

However, if you need to select the values for orders containing any of a list of parts or other changes, then you're likely to find that the sub-query notation is easier to manage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the clear response. While much longer, this method is easier to understand WHY it works so thank you. –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 5:16
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Not clear to me where the details that go into orders_total.value live in your tables? Usually you have something like:

select sum(op.qty*op.price) as Total
from orders o 
JOIN orders_products op on o.orders_id = op.orders_id 
where o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31 23:59' 
and op.products_id = 321

Or a full report like:

select p.ProductName, totals.Total
from (
    select op.products_id, sum(op.qty*op.price) as Total
    from orders o 
    join orders_products op on o.orders_id = op.orders_id 
    where o.date_purchased between '2010-01-01' and '2010-12-31 23:59' 
    group by op.products_id) totals
join Products p
on totals.products_id = p.products_id
share|improve this answer
    
Problem is that products_id is in one table, value is in a 2nd, while currency value is in a 3rd. –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 1:34
    
No, the problem is you don't have the totals.value broken down by product anywhere? So for order 2 how do I know what part of the total belongs to product 555 vs. 132? –  JBrooks Apr 13 '11 at 1:48
    
@Steven: further to what JBrooks says, normally you can order 10 of one part and 20 of another; where do you keep a record of the number of the item order. Normally, you also have a table of parts identifying valid part numbers and the list price (and usually a lot of other information too). Your schema is at best unusual. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '11 at 2:11
    
@both of you... I thought it was rather obvious that I was giving the bare minimum schema for my example. The real tables are far more complex but I didn't think it made sense to have you weed through all the unrelated specifics. –  Steven Apr 13 '11 at 5:14
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