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I was digging through some code, and I found some calls to mySQL_fetch_array. Is PHP case sensitive about function names? I recall reading this somewhere but can't seem to find any reference to it.

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No they don't seem to be. preference is usually lower case –  Jason Apr 13 '11 at 1:33
3  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2749781/…. No, functions are not case sensitive –  Bob Baddeley Apr 13 '11 at 1:33
    
For reference: it's buried here in the middle php.net/manual/en/functions.user-defined.php in a Note: block. –  mario Apr 13 '11 at 1:41
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I vote to leave this open — the title is much more general and explicit, thus it is likely to help more people. –  coreyward Apr 13 '11 at 1:42
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6 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

I am quoting from this:

Note: Function names are case-insensitive, though it is usually good form to call functions as they appear in their declaration.

So, its looks like user-defined is case-sensitive, there were a vote for making functions/objects under PHP5 case-sensitive.

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Yeah, but the vote never passed. –  Mark Tomlin Apr 13 '11 at 1:46
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PHP5 is already out, your only hope is PHP6 and I don't think they would take that step. It would break to much for little gain. –  Mark Tomlin Apr 13 '11 at 1:51
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@Ben Bauphinee, I never said I supported one or the other. I'm just stating the fact. –  Mark Tomlin Apr 19 '11 at 1:56
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wow. that is sad. although ImAgEcReAtEfRoMpNg() is a nice way of obfuscating code... –  Pontomedon Mar 20 '13 at 17:57
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Since the quote says "case-insensitive", why do you say "So it looks like user-defined is case-sensitive"? If that's a typo, you really should fix it. –  Barmar Dec 17 '13 at 1:29
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No. PHP functions are not case sensitive.

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TL;DR: class names are case-insensitive, but use always the same case as in the declaration (same as with functions). Also, instantiating classes with different case as they were defined may cause problems with autoloaders.


Also, class names are case-insensitive:

<?php
class SomeThing {
  public $x = 'foo';
}

$a = new SomeThing();
$b = new something();
$c = new sOmEtHING();
var_dump($a, $b, $c);

This outputs:

class SomeThing#1 (1) {
  public $x =>
  string(3) "foo"
}
class SomeThing#2 (1) {
  public $x =>
  string(3) "foo"
}
class SomeThing#3 (1) {
  public $x =>
  string(3) "foo"
}

Problem is using autoloaders and case-sensitive file-systems (like ext2/3/4), in that you must call the class name with the same case the file containing the class is named (not how the class name is actually cased), or use strtolower:

The class file:

<?php
// filename something.php
class SomeThing {
   ...
}

The autoloader function (__autoload or a function to register with spl_autoload_register)

function my_autloader($className) {
  $filename = CLASSES_DIR . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR . $className . '.php';
  if (file_exists($filename)) {
    require($filename);
  }
}

Now with this code:

$a = new something(); // works
$b = new SomeThing(); // does not work
$c = new SOMETHING(); // does not work

You may made this work (ie. having effectively case insensitive class names using an autoloader) if you added a call to strtolower() in the autoloader code, but as with functions, is just better to reference a class in the same way as it is declared, have the filename with the same case as the class name, use autoloaders, and forget using strtolower and the likes.

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No, they are not case sensitive, however, you should always use the case that is in the manual, for consistency.

However, variables are case sensitive.

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And method names also case-insensitive. eg:-

<?php
       class C { 

           public function method() { } 

           public function METHOD() { } 
       }

output:

PHP Fatal error:  Cannot redeclare C::METHOD() in ....php on line 6
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In conclusion of everyone's response. Even though PHP does not require character case consistency in all instances even till now in PHP5.

Best practice will be

always use same cases when reference back to either variables(its' mandatory) or functions(its' optional, but recommended).

You never know maybe one day the vote get through and you will save the whole nightmare of changing cases in your applications made couple of years ago that require update in PHP.

Hope it helps in anyway.

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