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I'm new to Objective-C. Essentially I want to store a set of Endpoint URLs as strings for use in my application, but I need a different domain based on whether the app is in DEBUG mode or not. I thought it might be useful to use a header file (Common.h for example) with some simple defines like so:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define kAPIEndpointHost @"http://example.dev"
#else
    #define kAPIEndpointHost @"http://www.example.com"
#endif

#define kAPIEndpointLatest          [kAPIEndpointHost stringByAppendingString:@"/api/latest_content"]
#define kAPIEndpointMostPopular     [kAPIEndpointHost stringByAppendingString:@"/api/most_popular"]

Obviously this doesn't work since you can't base a constant on the value of another constant apparently.

What's the "right" way to do this? Would it make more sense just to have a proper class with class methods that return the correct endpoint values?

EDIT: Just to be clear, the "Latest" and "MostPopular" strings that are based on the host string are what I'm having the most trouble with. The compiler doesn't like the stringByAppendingString portion of the #defines.

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I don't see what's wrong with this, tbph. –  Alexsander Akers Apr 13 '11 at 1:47
    
The compiler complains about the stringByAppendingString part. I guess you can't #define a constant based on another constant like this. –  markquezada Apr 13 '11 at 1:50
2  
What’s the actual compiler error message? I’ve just used your code snippet above and it compiled/run just fine. –  Bavarious Apr 13 '11 at 2:13
    
Your code doesn't base a constant on a constant, it defines a compile time macro that replaces all occurrences of kAPIEndpointLatest with [kAPIEndpointHost stringByAppendingString:@"/api/latest_content"]. With kAPIEndpointHost also being replaced depending on whether DEBUG is defined or not. –  Eric Mar 6 '12 at 18:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 36 down vote accepted

If you're just concatenating strings, you can use compile time string concatenation:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define kAPIEndpointHost @"http://example.dev"
#else
    #define kAPIEndpointHost @"http://www.example.com"
#endif

#define kAPIEndpointLatest          (kAPIEndpointHost @"/api/latest_content")
#define kAPIEndpointMostPopular     (kAPIEndpointHost @"/api/most_popular")
share|improve this answer
    
I guess this was really what I was asking. Thanks! –  markquezada Apr 13 '11 at 2:10
    
Now what if I want to use a variable instead of Hard-Coded URL? Eg. #define kAPIEndpointHost VariableName where VariableName is initialized in previous view. –  Jayprakash Dubey Jul 6 '13 at 11:13
    
@JayprakashDubey First of all, I would avoid using external varables in macros. You would have to use an NSString method since concatenation like this only works at compile time. I would #define kAPILatestPath @"/api/latest_content" and piece it together in the function using NSString* APIEndpointLatest = [variableName stringByAppendingString:APILatestPath]; –  cobbal Jul 6 '13 at 19:30

I don't like using #defines for string constants. If you want global constants and compile time concatenation. I would use the following:

Header file:

extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointHost;
extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointLatestPath;
extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointMostPopularPath;

Implementation file:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define API_ENDPOINT_HOST @"http://example.dev"
#else
#define API_ENDPOINT_HOST @"http://www.example.com"
#endif

NSString *const kAPIEndpointHost = API_ENDPOINT_HOST;
NSString *const kAPIEndpointLatestPath = (API_ENDPOINT_HOST @"/api/latest_content");
NSString *const kAPIEndpointMostPopularPath = (API_ENDPOINT_HOST @"/api/most_popular");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the alternate approach. Care to explain why this is more desirable than defining the string using a #define? –  markquezada Mar 7 '12 at 2:47
4  
A define is just a macro, so each time the macro appears, a new string is being created. A const NSString creates only one string reference. I also find constants easier to work with across files and in the case of keys, the actual value of the constant can be hidden in the implementation file, as its actual value is immaterial to the implementation. –  Eric Mar 7 '12 at 19:15
    
Awesome, thanks. +1 for teaching :) –  markquezada Mar 8 '12 at 22:07

In your header file:

extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointHost;
extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointLatestPath;
extern NSString *const kAPIEndpointMostPopularPath;

In your implementation file:

#ifdef DEBUG
    NSString *const kAPIEndpointHost = @"http://example.dev";
#else
    NSString *const kAPIEndpointHost = @"http://www.example.com";
#endif

NSString *const kAPIEndpointLatestPath = @"/api/latest_content";
NSString *const kAPIEndpointMostPopularPath = @"/api/most_popular";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I'm still unsure about how to define the Latest and MostPopular constants based on the host value though. –  markquezada Apr 13 '11 at 1:46
    
@mirthlab, I would just combine them in code when are creating the NSURL object. –  Black Frog Apr 13 '11 at 2:09
    
+1 Seems like this is the more correct way to define string constants for external use, I guess I was really looking more for how to concatenate the strings at compile time. I appreciate the response! –  markquezada Apr 13 '11 at 2:13
    
What's the advantage of this method over preprocessor defined strings in a single header file? Is it just good practice so that your string definitions are in a separate file? Is there a performance benefit? –  shim May 20 at 23:24

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