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I have few methods that returns different Generic Lists.

Exists in .net any class static method or whatever to convert any list into a datatable? The only thing that i can imagine is use Reflection to do this.

IF i have this:

List<Whatever> whatever = new List<Whatever>();

(This next code doesn't work of course, but i would like to have the possibility of:

DataTable dt = (DataTable) whatever;
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2  
Of course, a good question would be "why?" - when List<T> is in many cases a better tool than DataTable ;-p Each to their own, I guess... –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 8:30
    
I think this one may be a duplicate of this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/523153/… It even has a near identical answer. :-) –  mezoid Feb 19 '09 at 8:30
    
@MarcGravell: My "why?" is List<T> manipulation (Traversing columns & rows). I'm trying to make a pivot from a List<T> and accessing the properties via reflexion it's a pain. I'm doing it wrong? –  Eduardo Molteni Sep 21 '12 at 16:22
    
@Eduardo there are any number of tools to remove the reflection pain there - FastMember leaps to mind. It could also be that a DataTable is useful to specific scenarios - it all depends on the context. Perhaps the biggest problem is people using DataTable for all data storage just because it exists, without taking the time to consider the options and their scenario. –  Marc Gravell Sep 21 '12 at 16:32
    
@EduardoMolteni if you are interested, I updated FastMember to have direct support for this - see the updated answer –  Marc Gravell Jun 7 '13 at 9:32

13 Answers 13

up vote 137 down vote accepted

Here's a nice 2013 update using FastMember from NuGet:

IEnumerable<SomeType> data = ...
DataTable table = new DataTable();
using(var reader = ObjectReader.Create(data)) {
    table.Load(reader);
}

This uses the FastMember's meta-programming API for maximum performance. If you want to restrict it to particular members (or enforce the order), then you can do that too:

IEnumerable<SomeType> data = ...
DataTable table = new DataTable();
using(var reader = ObjectReader.Create(data, "Id", "Name", "Description")) {
    table.Load(reader);
}

Yes, this is pretty much the exact opposite of this one; reflection would suffice - or if you need quicker, HyperDescriptor in 2.0, or maybe Expression in 3.5. Actually, HyperDescriptor should be more than adequate.

For example:

// remove "this" if not on C# 3.0 / .NET 3.5
public static DataTable ToDataTable<T>(this IList<T> data)
{
    PropertyDescriptorCollection props =
        TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(T));
    DataTable table = new DataTable();
    for(int i = 0 ; i < props.Count ; i++)
    {
        PropertyDescriptor prop = props[i];
        table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, prop.PropertyType);
    }
    object[] values = new object[props.Count];
    foreach (T item in data)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
        {
            values[i] = props[i].GetValue(item);
        }
        table.Rows.Add(values);
    }
    return table;        
}

Now with one line you can make this many many times faster than reflection (by enabling HyperDescriptor for the object-type T).


edit re performance query; here's a test rig with results:

Vanilla 27179
Hyper   6997

I suspect that the bottleneck has shifted from member-access to DataTable performance... I doubt you'll improve much on that...

code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Diagnostics;
public class MyData
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public string B { get; set; }
    public DateTime C { get; set; }
    public decimal D { get; set; }
    public string E { get; set; }
    public int F { get; set; }
}

static class Program
{
    static void RunTest(List<MyData> data, string caption)
    {
        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        GC.WaitForFullGCComplete();
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500; i++)
        {
            data.ToDataTable();
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(caption + "\t" + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        List<MyData> foos = new List<MyData>();
        for (int i = 0 ; i < 5000 ; i++ ){
            foos.Add(new MyData
            { // just gibberish...
                A = i,
                B = i.ToString(),
                C = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(i),
                D = i,
                E = "hello",
                F = i * 2
            });
        }
        RunTest(foos, "Vanilla");
        Hyper.ComponentModel.HyperTypeDescriptionProvider.Add(
            typeof(MyData));
        RunTest(foos, "Hyper");
        Console.ReadLine(); // return to exit        
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice one, but isn't this kinda slow? just wondering. –  user29964 Feb 19 '09 at 8:35
1  
Well "as is", it'll be about as quick as reflection. If you enable HyperDescriptor, it will thrash reflection hands down... I'll run a quick test... (2 minutes) –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 8:36
    
Expression was mentioned for 3.5. If used how would it affect the code, is there any sample ? –  MicMit Mar 30 '10 at 6:40
    
@MicMit - it would make it more complex ;-p In all seriousness, I could put an example up but it would take quite a bit of effort - would it still be of interest? –  Marc Gravell Apr 30 '10 at 6:18
1  
@MarcGravell Yes I would be very interested in the Expression solution. For needing something fast + learning effect. Thank you Marc! –  Elisa Sep 21 '12 at 9:25

I had to modify Mark Gravell's sample code to handle nullable types and null values. I have included a working version below. Thanks Mark.

    public static DataTable ToDataTable<T>(this IList<T> data)
    {
        PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = 
            TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(T));
        DataTable table = new DataTable();
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
            table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(prop.PropertyType) ?? prop.PropertyType);
        foreach (T item in data)
        {
            DataRow row = table.NewRow();
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
                 row[prop.Name] = prop.GetValue(item) ?? DBNull.Value;
            table.Rows.Add(row);
        }
        return table;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Just what I was looking for. Thanks :D –  Tanner Watson Apr 24 '12 at 13:06
    
OK. This just saved me a bunch of time! Thanks. –  pStan Sep 27 '12 at 15:10
    
+1 for handling nulls –  joshua Feb 14 '13 at 15:13
    
This is an excellent answer. I would love to see this example expanded out to handle a group by list that would contain an item property and have columns created in the same way above. –  Jim Beam Jan 24 at 22:22
1  
To achieve that @Jim Beam, change the method signature to accept the return of GroupBy: public static DataTable ToDataTable<TKey, T>(this IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey, T>> data) Then, add an extra column before the foreach loop: table.Columns.Add("Key", Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(TKey)) ?? typeof(TKey)); And then add a loop around the data loop where you iterate the groups: foreach (IGrouping<TKey, T> group in data) { foreach (T item in group.Items) { See this GIST for full details: gist.github.com/rickdailey/8679306 –  Rick Dailey Jan 29 at 0:22

There is no generic in-built converter class in the .net framework base class library that can do this for you.

But here is a website with the code to do this using reflection.

And here is another

share|improve this answer
2  
For info, both are very inefficient - calling GetType().GetProperties()/GetProperty() per cell is a killer for large data... and they can be optimised to use the DataRow[DataColumn] indexer (fastest) instead of (for example) the DataRow[string] indexer. Just feedback on the links... –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 8:29

This is a simple mix of the solutions. It work with Nullable types.

public static DataTable ToDataTable<T>(this IList<T> list)
{
  PropertyDescriptorCollection props = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(T));
  DataTable table = new DataTable();
  for (int i = 0; i < props.Count; i++)
  {
    PropertyDescriptor prop = props[i];
    table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(prop.PropertyType) ?? prop.PropertyType);
  }
  object[] values = new object[props.Count];
  foreach (T item in list)
  {
    for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
      values[i] = props[i].GetValue(item) ?? DBNull.Value;
    table.Rows.Add(values);
  }
  return table;
}
share|improve this answer

A small change to Mark's answer to make it work with value types like List<string> to data table:

public static DataTable ListToDataTable<T>(IList<T> data)
{
    DataTable table = new DataTable();

    //special handling for value types and string
    if (typeof(T).IsValueType || typeof(T).Equals(typeof(string)))
    {

        DataColumn dc = new DataColumn("Value");
        table.Columns.Add(dc);
        foreach (T item in data)
        {
            DataRow dr = table.NewRow();
            dr[0] = item;
            table.Rows.Add(dr);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(T));
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
        {
            table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(prop.PropertyType) ?? prop.PropertyType);
        }
        foreach (T item in data)
        {
            DataRow row = table.NewRow();
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
            {
                try
                {
                    row[prop.Name] = prop.GetValue(item) ?? DBNull.Value;
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    row[prop.Name] = DBNull.Value;
                }
            }
            table.Rows.Add(row);
        }
    }
    return table;
}
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I've written a small library myself to accomplish this task. It uses reflection only for the first time an object type is to be translated to a datatable. It emits a method that will do all the work translating an object type.

Its blazing fast. You can find it here: ModelShredder on GoogleCode

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It's also possible through XmlSerialization. The idea is - serialize to XML and then readXml method of DataSet.

I use this code (from an answer in SO, forgot where)

    public static string SerializeXml<T>(T value) where T : class
{
    if (value == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

    XmlWriterSettings settings = new XmlWriterSettings();

    settings.Encoding = new UnicodeEncoding(false, false);
    settings.Indent = false;
    settings.OmitXmlDeclaration = false;
    // no BOM in a .NET string

    using (StringWriter textWriter = new StringWriter())
    {
        using (XmlWriter xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(textWriter, settings))
        {
            serializer.Serialize(xmlWriter, value);
        }
        return textWriter.ToString();
    }
}

so then it's as simple as:

        string xmlString = Utility.SerializeXml(trans.InnerList);

    DataSet ds = new DataSet("New_DataSet");
    using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(xmlString)))
    { 
        ds.Locale = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
        ds.ReadXml(reader); 
    }

Not sure how it stands against all the other answers of this post, but it's also a possibility.

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This link on MSDN is worth a visit: How to: Implement CopyToDataTable<T> Where the Generic Type T Is Not a DataRow

This adds an extension method that lets you do this:

// Create a sequence. 
Item[] items = new Item[] 
{ new Book{Id = 1, Price = 13.50, Genre = "Comedy", Author = "Gustavo Achong"}, 
  new Book{Id = 2, Price = 8.50, Genre = "Drama", Author = "Jessie Zeng"},
  new Movie{Id = 1, Price = 22.99, Genre = "Comedy", Director = "Marissa Barnes"},
  new Movie{Id = 1, Price = 13.40, Genre = "Action", Director = "Emmanuel Fernandez"}};

// Query for items with price greater than 9.99.
var query = from i in items
             where i.Price > 9.99
             orderby i.Price
             select i;

// Load the query results into new DataTable.
DataTable table = query.CopyToDataTable();
share|improve this answer

try this

 public static DataTable ListToDataTable<T>(IList<T> lst)
        {

             currentDT = CreateTable<T>();

            Type entType = typeof(T);

            PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(entType);
            foreach (T item in lst)
            {
                DataRow row = currentDT.NewRow();
                foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
                {

                    if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<decimal>) || prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<int>) || prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<Int64>))
                    {
                        if (prop.GetValue(item) == null)
                            row[prop.Name] = 0;
                        else
                            row[prop.Name] = prop.GetValue(item);
                    }
                    else
                        row[prop.Name] = prop.GetValue(item);



                }
                currentDT.Rows.Add(row);
            }

            return currentDT;

        }

        public static DataTable CreateTable<T>()
        {
            Type entType = typeof(T);
            DataTable tbl = new DataTable(DTName);
            PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(entType);
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in properties)
            {
                if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<decimal>))
                     tbl.Columns.Add(prop.Name, typeof(decimal));
                else if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<int>))
                    tbl.Columns.Add(prop.Name, typeof(int));
                else if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(Nullable<Int64>))
                    tbl.Columns.Add(prop.Name, typeof(Int64));
                else
                     tbl.Columns.Add(prop.Name, prop.PropertyType);
            }
            return tbl;
        }
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Marc Gravell's answer but in VB.NET

Public Shared Function ToDataTable(Of T)(data As IList(Of T)) As DataTable
    Dim props As PropertyDescriptorCollection = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(GetType(T))
    Dim table As New DataTable()
    For i As Integer = 0 To props.Count - 1
            Dim prop As PropertyDescriptor = props(i)
            table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, prop.PropertyType)
    Next
    Dim values As Object() = New Object(props.Count - 1) {}
    For Each item As T In data
            For i As Integer = 0 To values.Length - 1
                    values(i) = props(i).GetValue(item)
            Next
            table.Rows.Add(values)
    Next
    Return table
End Function
share|improve this answer

I also had to come up with an alternate solution, as none of the options listed here worked in my case. I was using an IEnumerable which returned an IEnumerable and the properties couldn't be enumerated. This did the trick:

// remove "this" if not on C# 3.0 / .NET 3.5
public static DataTable ConvertToDataTable<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data)
{
    List<IDataRecord> list = data.Cast<IDataRecord>().ToList();

    PropertyDescriptorCollection props = null;
    DataTable table = new DataTable();
    if (list != null && list.Count > 0)
    {
        props = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(list[0]);
        for (int i = 0; i < props.Count; i++)
        {
            PropertyDescriptor prop = props[i];
            table.Columns.Add(prop.Name, Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(prop.PropertyType) ?? prop.PropertyType);
        }
    }
    if (props != null)
    {
        object[] values = new object[props.Count];
        foreach (T item in data)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
            {
                values[i] = props[i].GetValue(item) ?? DBNull.Value;
            }
            table.Rows.Add(values);
        }
    }
    return table;
}
share|improve this answer
  using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
using System.Data;
using System.ComponentModel;

public partial class Default3 : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt = lstEmployee.ConvertToDataTable();
    }
    public static DataTable ConvertToDataTable<T>(IList<T> list) where T : class
    {
        try
        {
            DataTable table = CreateDataTable<T>();
            Type objType = typeof(T);
            PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(objType);
            foreach (T item in list)
            {
                DataRow row = table.NewRow();
                foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in properties)
                {
                    if (!CanUseType(property.PropertyType)) continue;
                    row[property.Name] = property.GetValue(item) ?? DBNull.Value;
                }

                table.Rows.Add(row);
            }
            return table;
        }
        catch (DataException ex)
        {
            return null;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return null;
        }

    }
    private static DataTable CreateDataTable<T>() where T : class
    {
        Type objType = typeof(T);
        DataTable table = new DataTable(objType.Name);
        PropertyDescriptorCollection properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(objType);
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in properties)
        {
            Type propertyType = property.PropertyType;
            if (!CanUseType(propertyType)) continue;

            //nullables must use underlying types
            if (propertyType.IsGenericType && propertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
                propertyType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(propertyType);
            //enums also need special treatment
            if (propertyType.IsEnum)
                propertyType = Enum.GetUnderlyingType(propertyType);
            table.Columns.Add(property.Name, propertyType);
        }
        return table;
    }


    private static bool CanUseType(Type propertyType)
    {
        //only strings and value types
        if (propertyType.IsArray) return false;
        if (!propertyType.IsValueType && propertyType != typeof(string)) return false;
        return true;
    }
}
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I realize that this has been closed for a while; however, I had a solution to this specific problem but needed a slight twist: the columns and data table needed to be predefined / already instantiated. Then I needed to simply insert the types into the data table.

So here's an example of what I did:

public static class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var dataTable = new System.Data.DataTable(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        var columnCode = new DataColumn("Code");
        var columnLength = new DataColumn("Length");
        var columnProduct = new DataColumn("Product");

        dataTable.Columns.AddRange(new DataColumn[]
            {
                columnCode,
                columnLength,
                columnProduct
            });

        var item = new List<SomeClass>();

        item.Select(data => new
        {
            data.Id,
            data.Name,
            data.SomeValue
        }).AddToDataTable(dataTable);
    }
}

static class Extensions
{
    public static void AddToDataTable<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, System.Data.DataTable table)
    {
        if (enumerable.FirstOrDefault() == null)
        {
            table.Rows.Add(new[] {string.Empty});
            return;
        }

        var properties = enumerable.FirstOrDefault().GetType().GetProperties();

        foreach (var item in enumerable)
        {
            var row = table.NewRow();
            foreach (var property in properties)
            {
                row[property.Name] = item.GetType().InvokeMember(property.Name, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, item, null);
            }
            table.Rows.Add(row);
        }
    }
}
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