Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a class which implements INotifyPropertyChanged. I'm using Simon Cropp's excellent NotifyPropertyWeaver to inject INotifyPropertyChanged code into the properties. However I now need to modify the setters for a bunch of properties to all do the same thing after the set completes. Modifying the setters requires creating backing fields, implementing the get, implementing the set, etc all with identical implementations except the name of the backing field. I just avoided doing all of this by using NotifyPropertyWeaver.

Instead, I could have my class subscribe to it's own PropertyChanged event and handle the post change operation in the event handler. Is this a safe thing to do? I realize I'll have to watch out for infinite recursion resulting in a stack overflow if my operation modifies one of the properties I'm watching. Are there any other issues I need to watch out for?

Here's an example

public class Foo : INotifyPropertyChanged{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Prop1 { get; set; }
    public Prop2 { get; set; }
    public Prop3 { get; set; }
    public Prop4 { get; set; }

    public Foo(){
        this.PropertyChanged +=
            new PropertyChangedEventHandler(Foo_PropertyChanged);
    }

    private void Foo_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        switch (e.PropertyName)
        {
            case "Prop1":
            case "Prop2":
            case "Prop3":
                DoSomething();
                break;
            case "Prop4":
                DoSomethingElse();
                break;
        }
    }

    private void DoSomething()
    {
        ....
    }

    private void DoSomethingElse()
    {
        ....
    }
}

Edit

Joel Lucsy kindly pointed out that I do not need to subscribe to the event. I had been allowing NotifyPropertyWeaver to inject OnPropertyChanged. Instead I could just implement OnPropertyChanged myself to accomplish the same thing.

Updated code:

public class Foo : INotifyPropertyChanged{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Prop1 { get; set; }
    public Prop2 { get; set; }
    public Prop3 { get; set; }
    public Prop4 { get; set; }

    private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        switch (propertyName)
        {
            case "Prop1":
            case "Prop2":
            case "Prop3":
                DoSomething();
                break;
            case "Prop4":
                DoSomethingElse();
                break;
        }
    }

    private void DoSomething()
    {
        ....
    }

    private void DoSomethingElse()
    {
        ....
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you give a more real world code sample so I can better understand what you are tying to achive? –  Simon Apr 13 '11 at 22:27

3 Answers 3

For one thing you just implement OnPropertyChanged and not have to use the event.

Second, this is considered bad form. NotifyPropertyWeaver does a lot of checking in the code and detects dependencies between properties. For instance, if you use property A inside the code for property B, NotifyPropertyWeaver will add a second OnPropertyChanged for B inside the code for A to make sure everything is updated.

In short, don't do it that way, type everything out.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, there is no need to subscribe to the event if I explicitly implement OnPropertyChanged instead of expecting NotifyPropertyWeaver to do it for me. –  Robert Graves Apr 13 '11 at 3:35
    
I agree NotifyPropertyWeaver will handle the dependencies between properties. However that is not what I'm trying to accomplish. Having 10 classes each containing 5 properties which all have the exact same 12 line implementation except for the backing field name is not only tedious, but also error prone. I was hoping to make things easier to read and maintain, which is why I'm using NotifyPropertyWeaver. –  Robert Graves Apr 13 '11 at 3:48
    
A couple of things you could try. PostSharp would allow you more flexibility than NotifyPropertyWeaver. Or you could try the built in template thing I believe is called T4. Or use snippets to generate the code. –  Joel Lucsy Apr 13 '11 at 4:12
    
@Joel could you detail how PostSharp is more flexible than NPW for this case? I am curious to know what features I could be missing –  Simon Apr 13 '11 at 22:29
    
@Simon PostSharp can do much more than just INotifyPropertyChanged. Some specifics scenarios can be found here. –  Joel Lucsy Apr 14 '11 at 0:50

I've done this/used code that has done this before and have noticed no great side effects code wise. Depending upon the number of properties you could see a performance hit, but it probably would be minor. What I have noticed is that it is not always immediately clear when looking at the code why effects are happening when you use this pattern. What you have to be careful of is how you are designing your classes. The automatic properties are nice when you are putting together the class quickly, but they can become a hindrance on your over all design. I usually don't use them unless its a quick mock-up of an object or its a very simple object I'm using for transferring data. The question you have to ask yourself is if you are designing your object this way because its the way that best fits your code, program, style, or because you are trying to use a specific feature i.e. automatic properties.

One thing to consider is, are you going to do the same action for every field, or are you going to have different actions? If you have different actions you quickly get a big unwieldy method. If they are the same actions, it probably is easier to manage.

The normal way I implement the INotifyProperty interface is to create a method that changes the field, performs the notification, and can also take an Action to perform after the change is made. This avoids having all the big conditional statements and gives fine grain control over actions, but has enough fine grain control to be completely flexible. If I am creating a lot of objects that are related, I also usually just create a base class to inherit all of them from that has this change method as a protected method, so I don't have to re-implement the pattern once per class.

share|improve this answer
    
How are automatic properties a hindrance to design? If you need to add logic / checks to a getter or setter down the track wouldn't you simply create a backing field and expand the property to an explicit implementation? –  Adrian Clark Apr 13 '11 at 2:31
    
@Aydsman What I was trying to say is they can be a hindrance if you design around them to keep them around, by not replacing them with a backing field. They are great (love them) when you have no need to have a backing field, but you shouldn't avoid making a backing field just because you want to use them. –  Craig Suchanec Apr 13 '11 at 2:33
    
can you point me to any information on the Action approach you mention above? –  Robert Graves Apr 13 '11 at 3:58
    
@DarthChucks The pattern didn't come from any location, but organically grew out of experience and need. I am sure somebody has also written about it somewhere, I just don't have references for it off the top of my head. If you want an example of how to implement it I can provide it. –  Craig Suchanec Apr 14 '11 at 0:34
    
I see. Apologies, I didn't get that from your post. I absolutely agree; hacks in order to keep auto properties as auto properties are stupid and dangerous. The beauty of auto properties is you can expand them without breaking API compatibility. –  Adrian Clark Apr 14 '11 at 2:52

I have added a On_PropertyName_Changed feature to NotifyPropertyWeaver http://code.google.com/p/notifypropertyweaver/wiki/On_PropertyName_Changed

So if you write this

public class Foo : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public string Prop1 { get; set; }
    public string Prop2 { get; set; }
    public string Prop3 { get; set; }
    public string Prop4 { get; set; }

    void OnProp3Changed()
    {
    }

    void OnProp4Changed()
    {
    }
}

Calls to OnProp3Changed and OnProp4Changed will be injected into the sets of Prop3 and Prop4 respectively.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.