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I'm looking for a way (if it's even possible) of using an XSL transform of an XSD document to remove unused elements. This comes up a lot in my job where a company will define an XSD with absolutely everything in it, but then they will want to create a cut-down version for a single root element within it.

To explain further, I might have an XSD like the following:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" elementFormDefault="qualified" attributeFormDefault="unqualified">
    <xs:element name="RootElement">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:sequence>
                <xs:element ref="ChildElement"/>
            </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
    <xs:element name="ChildElement"/>
    <xs:element name="UnusedElement"/>
</xs:schema>

What I would like to be able to do is to set up an XSL where I provide the starting element (in this case RootElement) and it will copy over all dependent elements but omit the unused ones. In the above example, if I passed in RootElement I'd expect to see RootElement and ChildElement included but UnusedElement omitted.

(When I say "provide the starting element", I'm quite happy to crack open the stylesheet and type xsl:template match="RootElement" where required.)

This would obviously have to be recursive, so would navigate the entire structure defined below the starting element, and any element in that schema that was not used would be discarded.

(Of course, it would be even better if it could do the same in any imported schemas!)

I've searched Google extensively and can't find anything on this - I'm not sure if that means it's not possible or not.

Thanks!

Edit: Actually I probably should clarify and say that I would like to remove unused elements AND types, so it would follow both ref="childElement" and type="someType" links.

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 13 '11 at 13:46
    
Thanks Dimitre. Your solution came close (see my comments below) but there are a couple of problems with it still (strips type definitions, doesn't span imported schemas). Possibly my sample XML was overly simplified. This may not realistically be a solvable problem with a declarative language, or at least not worth the effort in trying to tell XSLT how to do it. However unless something unexpected pops up in the next day or two I will mark your response as the (closest) answer. Thanks! –  Chris Chapman Apr 14 '11 at 2:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" >
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="ptopElementName" select="'RootElement'"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vTop" select=
 "/*/xs:element[@name=$ptopElementName]"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vNames"
      select="$vTop/descendant-or-self::*/@name"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vRefs"
      select="$vTop/descendant-or-self::*/@ref"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vTypes"
      select="$vTop/descendant-or-self::*/@type"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="xs:element">
  <xsl:if test=
    "@name=$vNames
    or
     @name=$vRefs
    or
     ancestor-or-self::*[@name=$ptopElementName]">
   <xsl:call-template name="identity"/>
  </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="xs:complexType|xs:simpleType">
  <xsl:if test=
   "@name=$vTypes
    or
     ancestor-or-self::*[@name=$ptopElementName]">
   <xsl:call-template name="identity"/>
  </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" elementFormDefault="qualified" attributeFormDefault="unqualified">
    <xs:element name="RootElement">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:sequence>
                <xs:element ref="ChildElement"/>
            </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType></xs:element>
    <xs:element name="ChildElement"/>
    <xs:element name="UnusedElement"/>
</xs:schema>

produces the wanted, corect result:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" elementFormDefault="qualified" attributeFormDefault="unqualified">
   <xs:element name="RootElement">
      <xs:complexType>
         <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element ref="ChildElement"/>
         </xs:sequence>
      </xs:complexType>
   </xs:element>
   <xs:element name="ChildElement"/>
</xs:schema>
share|improve this answer
4  
A brave effort but it looks to me as if it won't work if the schema document has a target namespace, or if it includes/imports other schema documents. Processing XSD documents in their full generality using XSLT is hard - it's quite possible if you know that you're only using a subset of the XSD language, but very challenging if the use of XSD is unconstrained. (Also, note that an element declaration can appear to be "unused" but still affect what's allowed in a strict wildcard (<xs:any processContents="strict"/>) –  Michael Kay Apr 13 '11 at 19:40
1  
@Michael-Kay: Yes, I fully realize that this solution is very limited to the OP's stated requirements. I would need a good refresh of my rusty XSD knowledge in order to claim that the solution covers even all major cases. Also, it seems to me that referencing names and types is transitive and as such needs to be done in many steps in order to construct the transitive closure of the "references/referenced" relation -- this, of course, is not done here. Would be a lot of work even for a bounty. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 13 '11 at 21:17
    
Thanks Dimitre, that's certainly a pretty cool solution (and quick response). Unfortunately Michael was right about the target namespace thing - my sample was a very simplified version whereas my actual schemas have target namespaces in them. Interestingly it also removed the XML declaration and all the type definitions (not sure if the types removal is due to the same thing). –  Chris Chapman Apr 14 '11 at 2:04
    
Michael, we are thankfully only using a fairly simple subset of the XSD spec, basically just elements, element references and complex types/simple types extending other types. I don't believe there are any extensible parts of the schema using xs:any or anything. I'm not sure any simple solution would be able to help with that...! Our other big issue is the schemas are split over multiple files, using imports. "Cleaning" them up is a much bigger issue! I might have to resort to code e.g. Java...? –  Chris Chapman Apr 14 '11 at 2:08
2  
@Chris: one thing you might consider is to start not from raw XSD documents, but from the SCM documents produced using the -scmout option of the Saxon schema processor. This basically gives you an XML representation of the "schema components" in a canonical form, where you don't have to worry about all the details of xs:import/xs:include, groups, local vs global declarations, namespace prefixes, and all the other variability of XSD schema documents. –  Michael Kay Apr 21 '11 at 9:57

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