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I would like to know why we use XML for the creating user interface layouts in Android. I know that it decouples the buisness logic from the design but what is the significance of the XML other than that?

Also I would like to know the significance of autogenerated R.java file in this. All I know that it is generated according to the changes in the resources and that it helps us to access the widgets and resources through their ids.

It would be great if someone could give a clear idea on these two aspects.

P.S.: I haven't put these questions as two different ones because I believe that the answers are interelated.

Edit:(More Info) Unlike what everyone said about the xml being easy and efficient.Here is what i read from Hello Android from Ed Brunnette which made sense.

Android is optimized for mobile devices with limited memory and horsepower, so you may find it strange that it uses XML so pervasively. After all, XML is a verbose, human-readable format not known for its brevity or efficiency, right?

Although you see XML when writing your program, the Eclipse plug-in invokes the Android resource compiler, aapt, to preprocess the XML into a compressed binary format.**It is this format, not the original XML text, that is stored on the device

If you know more on this please add on

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@Abdullah:Quote from Hello Android by Ed Brunette: Android is optimized for mobile devices with limited memory and horsepower, so you may find it strange that it uses XML so pervasively. After all, XML is a verbose, human-readable format not known for its brevity or efficiency, right? Although you see XML when writing your program, the Eclipse plug-in invokes the Android resource compiler, aapt, to preprocess the XML into a compressed binary format. It is this format,not the original XML text, that is stored on the device. –  rogerstone Apr 13 '11 at 7:28
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That's correct but keep in mind that any format could have been used as the source format before it is compiled. The reason that XML was chosen is mainly because of its familiarity and the number of IDE tools that natively support it. The developers could have chosen JSON for example and still compiled that to binary. –  Abdullah Jibaly Apr 13 '11 at 15:35

5 Answers 5

XML is easy to parse and manipulate programmatically, it's basically a tree structure and most UI creation tools already use it. It really has nothing to do with decoupling business logic because you can define Java code in Android using a Model-View-Controller pattern just as well.

The auto-generated R.java file is a helper for the IDE so that you can get the benefit of autocomplete when you want to access a resource. It also stops you from making stupid mistakes since the compiler will complain if you try to access a resource you haven't defined. If you were using a simple properties file you wouldn't know until runtime that the 'key' you are using is missing.

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@Vladmir,@IanNorton,@sub:I have updated a new aspect i have found on this in the comments.Please check that out and let me know your views –  rogerstone Apr 13 '11 at 7:36
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unlike what everyone said about the xml being easy and efficient.Here is what i read from Hello Android from Ed Brunnette which made sense.

Android is optimized for mobile devices with limited memory and horsepower, so you may find it strange that it uses XML so pervasively. After all, XML is a verbose, human-readable format not known for its brevity or efficiency, right?

Although you see XML when writing your program, the Eclipse plug-in invokes the Android resource compiler, aapt, to preprocess the XML into a compressed binary format.**It is this format, not the original XML text, that is stored on the device.

This was the kind of answer that i was looking for.(sorry if my question meant otherwise).

The reason that XML was chosen is mainly because of its familiarity and the number of IDE tools that natively support it. The developers could have chosen JSON for example and still compiled that to binary.The auto-generated R.java file is a helper for the IDE so that you can get the benefit of autocomplete when you want to access a resource--by abdullah

If anybody has more information please add on to this or post as a different anwser.

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Same as why is silverlight with xml the answer is simple xml give power by integration and scalability. R.java is for indexing having things organized is never bad. Sorry my english

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One possible reason is that you need not have any working java underneath in order to be able to see the visual layout of the interface you are working on. The xml ui element/page is essentially a document that you can parse and display. If this were a source file you would have to either carefully parse it or compile and run it (all of which are more complex than parsing xml)

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Xml as itself is well readable both by human and machine. Also, it is scalable and simple to develop. Also, you have already mentioned the decoupling.

As for R.java - it is just the way of accessing widgets. The solution is rather good, as it is using ints instead of string to use less memory and in the same time provides well readable names for the simplicity of development.

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