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printf ("%#p [ buf  ] (%.2d) : %s \n", buf, strlen (buf), buf);

I never see %#p (%.2d) before,how does it work?

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§7.19.6.1/6 says # converts the result to an "alternative form". However, as far as I see this item, applying # to p format specifier results in an undefined behaviour. So, I'm not sure %#p is really the original coder's intent(possibly typo?). –  Ise Wisteria Apr 13 '11 at 10:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/printf/:

Used with o, x or X specifiers the value is preceeded with 0, 0x or 0X respectively for values different than zero.

Used with e, E and f, it forces the written output to contain a decimal point even if no digits would follow. By default, if no digits follow, no decimal point is written.

Used with g or G the result is the same as with e or E but trailing zeros are not removed.

So it seems to do nothing in your case, since p is used to print a pointer address. I guess some compilers might interpret this differently, but I can't find any mention of it.

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In your case (p conversion) the result is undefined according to the man page. Anyway, %p and %#p prints the same value on my machine (looks like 0x7FFFF000)

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Not sure if that is a valid use of the '#' flag:

  • Used with o, x or X specifiers the value is preceeded with 0, 0x or 0X respectively for values different than zero.
  • Used with e, E and f, it forces the written output to contain a decimal point even if no digits would follow. By default, if no digits follow, no decimal point is written.
  • Used with g or G the result is the same as with e or E but trailing zeros are not removed.

It will most likely print an alternately formatted form for the pointer, appending 0x to the address.

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It's a flag for the format identifier. It will more than likely print out 0x before the pointed value (but I have not checked TBH)

A good explanation is found here

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p specifies to print an address (i.e. a pointer). The # flag specifies "alternate form", which in this case, probably prepends 0x to the output.

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