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I have a table with (order_id, timestamp). The timestamps represents the orders delivery date, which may occur in the future. How can i get the last 5 orders from now and the next 5 orders from now using one select statement? It it possible to do that in sql without using a union query? Something like this, but without the union:

select * from table where timestamp <= current_timestamp
order by timestamp desc limit 5
union
select * from table where timestamp >= current_timestamp
order by timestamp asc limit 5
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SQL is good, but I don't think it's good enough to select 5 orders from the future. (Think about what timestamp >= current_timestamp means.) What's the real problem? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Apr 13 '11 at 10:09
    
Updated the question, the orders timestamps may very well be >= current_timestamp. –  Björn Lindqvist Apr 13 '11 at 10:45
    
What DBMS do you use? Why don't you want to use UNION? –  Mikael Eriksson Apr 13 '11 at 10:48
    
PostgreSQL. I figured there must be a smarter way than using a union query. But if what I have is already the most optimal query, I guess I'll have to accept that. –  Björn Lindqvist Apr 13 '11 at 11:12
    
yep thats the idea, but you should use UNION ALL instead of UNION and replace the "<=" with "<". AN order where timestamp=current_timestamp will be listed twice and then UNION eliminates the duplicates... unnecessary work. –  peufeu May 4 '11 at 8:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think we can do this with a window function:

WITH Numbered AS (
   SELECT
       *, --TODO, pick columns
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN timestamp < current_timestamp THEN timestamp ELSE '18000101' END desc) as HistoricRN,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY CASE WHEN timestamp >= current_timestamp THEN timestamp ELSE '99991231' END) as FutureRN
    FROM table
)
SELECT
   * --TODO, pick columns
from Numbered
where HistoricRN between 1 and 5 or FutureRN between 1 and 5

Note I've arbitrarily decided that if the timestamp exactly matches, it will be in just the future rows. Your original query puts it in both groups (but then the UNION would eliminate it), so if a timestamp exactly matches, your query would return 9 rows instead of 10.

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I've tried this approach in both PostgreSQL and SQL Server and it doesn't work. The row numbers are not counted from "current_timestamp" so checking if they are in [1, 5] doesnt return anything. –  Björn Lindqvist May 3 '11 at 16:12
    
@Bjorn - you're right, sorry. I had to move the CASE expressions inside the ORDER BY clauses, and pick suitable alternate dates when the CASE expressions don't match, to get the sort order correct. I've edited my answer. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 4 '11 at 7:10
    
Awesome, now it works perfectly! I guess my original union query is more efficient, but this is a very clever solution indeed. –  Björn Lindqvist May 4 '11 at 8:20

I don't think a union is such a bad idea but your query must be fixed. You need to embed your queries in sub-queries to be able to use order by and limit.

(Not tested in PostgreSQL).

select * from
  (select *
   from table
   where timestamp <= current_timestamp
   order by timestamp desc limit 5) as T
union
select * from 
  (select *
   from table
   where timestamp >= current_timestamp
   order by timestamp asc limit 5) as T
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SQL Server provides an option in terms of TOP. Here are some examples

SELECT TOP 5 order_id, timestamp FROM table WHERE timestamp < current_timestamp

A quick search in WWW told me that there is no direct equivalent for this in Oracle. You are left with using rownum. As you know rownum is assigned before sorting you may not get actual result. Here is the workaround

SELECT e.*
  FROM (SELECT * FROM table WHERE timestamp < current_timestamp ORDER BY empno) e
 WHERE rownum <= 5 
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