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Is it possible to make AJAX-calls (e.g. using jQuery.ajax() ) from local html/js file (e.g. file://home/a.html) to the remote server (e.g. http://domain:8080/api)? If yes, how to enable such XSS (e.g. in FF3)?

I suppose it's some browser's security settings, but can't find which ones.

And suppose there is an answer without any server-side changes (such as JSONP).

Thanks.

Code snippet:

function foo(){
       $.ajax({
           type: "POST",
           url: "http://localhost:8080/api",
           data: "Hello world",
           success: function (data, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
               alert(data);
               alert("success!");
           },
           error: function(XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
               alert("fail");
           }
       });
   }

...
...

<button onclick="foo()">click me</button>

I'm getting "success" but empty data.

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1  
please detail, if domain:8080 is your server? i.e. the one you could configure –  zindel Apr 13 '11 at 11:44
    
yes, but I suppose there is an answer without any server-side changes (such as JSONP). –  Nikolay Vyahhi Apr 13 '11 at 11:46
1  
There is no any settings required..please post your code so we can help you... –  Kishan Gajjar Apr 13 '11 at 11:47
    
Kishan, I've added code snippet to the post. –  Nikolay Vyahhi Apr 13 '11 at 11:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there are no other ways but use one of 2 methods: either JSONP as stated in previous answers or CORS. Both require server-side changes. JSONP is better if you need older browser's support, but CORS is obviously cleaner and likely doesn't require server-side scripts changes, modifying server configuration should be enough.

Hope this helps.

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Add callback=? at the end of your url which you passing to ajax

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I suppose there is an answer without any server-side changes (such as JSONP). –  Nikolay Vyahhi Apr 13 '11 at 11:59

JSONP is the way to go. If you are accessing a third party API, hopefully it will already support it. If it is your own API, you might have to add support for it yourself. You might find this related question helps you get some background: Please explain JSONP

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