Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is probably a bit subjective, but I'm in fact looking for answers that contain some reasoning.

I've met the following two programming styles for conditions in loop bodies. This:

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    if (myArray[i].isEmpty())
        continue;

    doSomeStuff();
    doSomeMoreStuff();
}

And this:

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    if (!myArray[i].isEmpty()) {
        doSomeStuff();
        doSomeMoreStuff();
    }
}

I've usually used the first style, because it keeps indentation levels sane, especially when there's more than one condition. But I began to wonder if the second isn't actually cleaner. Do you have a preferred style and can you explain why?

Update:

Here's a more realistic example. Imagine I'm reading a file like this "First name: Last name", e.g.:

John;Doe
Joe;Bloggs

This is how I read each line into a name object, ignoring empty lines (which may occur):

while (line = file.readLine()) {
    if (line.isEmpty())
        continue;

    String[] columns = line.split(";");
    names.add(new Name(columns[0], columns[1]));
}
share|improve this question
1  
I use the first one as well. –  khmarbaise Apr 13 '11 at 12:35
    
First style, for the same reason as you do. Only with braces around the continue. –  Jon Apr 13 '11 at 12:39
    
I think this is more personal preference. The first one is a lot easier to read in my opinion though. –  Grammin Apr 13 '11 at 12:39

13 Answers 13

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The fact is that the second increases cyclomatic complexity and may lead to the arrowhead antipattern.

In addition, keeping all your "code should not pass this point" checks at the beginning allows you to group them together, which means they are easier to maintain imho.

share|improve this answer
    
LOL, the arrowhead antipattern is awesome :) But are you sure the first style doesn't increase cyclomatic complexity? Both styles allow exactly the same number of different paths through the program. –  futlib Apr 13 '11 at 15:49
    
@futlib: That is absolutely true. For your example. But as the complexity of the loop increases, so can the nesting of your if statements. In other words, your requirements would only increase CC if they get more complex, whereas if you bail early on the loop you can keep the CC to 1. –  Will Apr 13 '11 at 16:19
    
I think you're right about the cyclomatic complexity, it will get more complicated with more conditions. So both of your arguments are pretty good. –  futlib Apr 14 '11 at 12:07
    
If you achieve the arrowhead it is IMHO poor design, then you should have split up the function a long time before that –  Kenneth Jakobsen Apr 14 '11 at 12:17

I by far prefer the second as i find it semantically easier to read. Which makes refactoring easier.

share|improve this answer

It depends very much on what the actual code looks like; if it's more sequential in nature, I prefer the initial continue if a condition is met, if it's branching anyway, I use a branching to skip the iteration; however if the nested levels get to deep, I might use continue anway... If you want a single style and always use that for every loop, I'd recommend the second version (branching), however, as that is less situational than continue.

share|improve this answer

It often depends on the condition. I try to avoid negated conditions, especially more complex ones. Therefore, I come out often with the first style. It is not so bad to sort out special cases at the beginning so that one can write the algorithm for the general case in one go.

share|improve this answer

I use continue (or sometimes break or goto in the middle of the loop), but always put it all on one line (so continue cannot accidentally be separated from if), and always provide a comment of the form "if …, we're done."

Comments are a powerful tool. Ten levels of indentation really are harder to read than goto here and there. Some control-flow structures just will not document themselves.

share|improve this answer

Just refactor. The reason is that if MyObject is empty, that's an internal call it can ask itself. There is no reason to have someone else ask MyObject if it's empty just to have MyObject do something. This is logic that belongs to MyObject. You want to put the logic inside of the object as much as possible so it can be reused by other potential callers, but also so that other parts of the system don't call into things they don't have ownership of if you can avoid it.

for(MyObject object : list) {
    object.doABunchOfSimilarThings();
}

....

class MyObject {

    ...

    public void doABunchOfSimilarThings() {
        if(notEmpty()) {
            doThing1();
            doThing2();
            doThing3();        
        }
    }

    ...

}
share|improve this answer

For me it depends on the contents of the loop.

If the loop only contains up to 5 lines and a single condition, I will generally use the second style, since I find it makes it a bit easier to see when exactly the code will be executed.

If there are a lot of nested conditions (with no else), I prefer the first syntax, for much of the same reason as you: preventing large indentation. When using the second style, each subsequent condition check needlessly increases the indentation level, reducing readability.

share|improve this answer
    
If there are a lot of nested conditions, etc., then the function is too long and too complicated, and needs to be refactored. I prefer the second by far, but... if the function is complicated enough for it to make a serious difference in readability, the function is too complicated, and needs refactoring. –  James Kanze Apr 13 '11 at 13:16
    
@james-kanze Yes, that's a good point you make. However, imagine that you have lot of preconditions on your function and you want to throw exceptions when they are not met, something like that leads to huge indentations when done using the second style. –  Darhuuk Apr 13 '11 at 13:35

continue , goto , break are first words that thoughts us not to use. If method was a bit longer you will see yourself it is a bad idea. Also second lesson was use positive conditions whereever possible: )

share|improve this answer

Disclaimer: The answers in this post reflect solely on the thoughts of the answerer, and should not be taken as a general consensus.

For me, it's about readability. Even though I can understand both loop bodies, some may find time understanding them.

The 2nd loop body executes only if an element in an array isn't empty while the first finds an element of an array that is empty and tells the for loop to continue.

Readability on the 2nd loop makes it easy for conscious debugging too as if you it tells a person that the element can never be empty if doSomeStuff() or doSomeMoreStuff() is called.

share|improve this answer

The second is better. Try to avoid using continue, break, and goto (raptors?) while programming. They are just crutches.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that gotos are bad, but continue, break and return are a bit difficult IMO. At least they depend on the structure of the program, which is completely ignored by goto. –  futlib Apr 13 '11 at 16:00
    
@futlib: Agreed that continue and break are more difficult. But in cases like these, the continue is easily avoided... –  Andrew Apr 13 '11 at 19:35

The second one. If you get many indentation levels you can refactor by converting blocks to separate methods.

share|improve this answer

How about:

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    doStuffToValue(myArray[i]);    
}

void doStuffToValue(String value) {
    if (value.isEmpty()) {
        return;
    } 
    doSomeStuff();
    doSomeMoreStuff();
}

That way you make checking validity of the value a concern of the method, not of the loop body. You could even write a unit test for the doStuffToValue method if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
But would you do this for processing individual lines in a file, like in the example I posted in the update above? I somehow think that's too closely related to the loop reading the file to be moved to a separate function. –  futlib Apr 13 '11 at 15:59
    
Why would iterating over and reading lines be closely related to deserializing the contents? In a simple case like you gave you might not bother, but conceptually there are some good reasons to split off a separate method: you can unit test the deserialization code more easily and you can re-use the code in different contexts (i.e. read data from database or from a UrlConnection). –  Adriaan Koster Apr 17 '11 at 10:25

I don't think I've ever used a continue in a loop, although I use that first idiom often with return at the beginning of functions. Part of the reason style-wise is continue only works with the context of needing to skip the entire remainder of a loop, whereas the if statement works regardless of context. Therefore, if tends to be more consistent with other parts of your code.

A less subjective reason is if you're frequently skipping entire loop iterations, there's usually a way to refactor that decision to be made outside the loop, and that has performance implications. For your example, I would prefer to use a data structure that would never have empty values.

For unavoidably complex things where performance isn't an issue, I tend to prefer Adriaan's method of decomposing the loop body into functions.

Between those 3 reasons, the situations where continue is syntactically possible, is easiest to read, is consistent with other code using that data structure, and also the most performant solution just don't come up frequently enough to justify its use.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.