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I have this table holding user comments on trouble issues:

create table related_comment (
        id       varchar(20) references trouble_noreset,
        username varchar(20) not null,
        comment  varchar(320) not null,
        created  timestamp default current_timestamp
);

and it works ok. But now after some usage a new table similar to the existing trouble_noreset has emerged - the trouble_reported.

Since both tables have an id column, but I do not want to merge them together, is there maybe a way to modify the constraint for the related_comment table?

From searching around I understand, that I can't have a foreign key across several tables.

But maybe I can have something like:

create table related_comment (
        id       varchar(20) check (id exists in trouble_noreset or id exists in trouble_reported),
        username varchar(20) not null,
        comment  varchar(320) not null,
        created  timestamp default current_timestamp
);

? I'm using PostgreSQL 8.4.7 with CentOS 5.5

Thank you! Alex

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

To make the related_comment table useful, you have to use distinct keys for the trouble_noreset and trouble_reported tables anyway, else you don't know how to join.

I would implement it like this:

create table related_comment (
        id int4 primary key,
        noreset_id       varchar(20),
        trouble_id       varchar(20),
        username varchar(20) not null,
        comment  varchar(320) not null,
        created  timestamp default current_timestamp
);

and create the two required foreign key indexes, and a check that requires that exactly one of noreset_id and trouble_id is set.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I haven't mentioned, that the id is really distinct over the two tables - because the data comes every morning copied from a huge remote Oracle database – Alexander Farber Apr 13 '11 at 13:15
    
Okey, than you have to know that Foreign keys are internally nothing else than two triggers. Write one for each table, and do the checks for yourself. Use two ON DELETE AND UPDATE triggers on the destination tables, and an ON INSERT AND ON UPDATE trigger on the related_comment. – Daniel Apr 13 '11 at 17:38

Sounds like your foreign key is backwards. I'd add a other table for comment threads (related_comment_thread), FK related_comment to related_comment_thread, then FK trouble_noreset and trouble_reported to related_comment_thread:

related_comment_thread (
    -- standard bookkeeping stuff like ids and timestamps
)
related_comment (
    -- as now but no FK for id, each comment gets its own unique id
    thread references related_comment_thread
)
trouble_noreset (
    -- what's there now
    comments references related_comment_thead
)
trouble_reported (
    -- what's there now
    comments references related_comment_thead
)

This way you get sensible referential integrity across all your tables at the cost of an extra join; relational databases are good at joins though so there's nothing to worry about. This approach also makes it trivially easy to add comments to another table if you need such a thing in the future.

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