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I often need to clone production data to investigate bugs. Even with a trivial database size heroku db:pull (taps) takes 5+ minutes and seems to have a high chance of failing. Is there an alternative method to pull the database?

Libraries for alternative processes / articles would also be appreciated.

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3 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Check out pgbackups. It has replaced the Heroku bundle command and will give you a the postgres equivalent of mysqldump. This is far more civilized than Taps for large datasets.

heroku pgbackups:capture

Will create a dumpfile and store it. To download the dumpfile you need the url which you get with

heroku pgbackups:url b001 (or whatever the id number of the backup is)

That will return an url from which you can download your dump. You can paste it into Firefox if you want or use curl/wget like they suggest. The use pg_restore to load the dump file into your database as they say in the docs:

pg_restore --verbose --clean --no-acl --no-owner -h localhost -U test_user -d myapp_development /home/mike/Downloads/b001.dump

pg_restore: connecting to database for restore

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I'm already aware of pg backups but I don't know how you can use it to integrate a local pg database. Would you be able to expand on your answer? –  Jack Kinsella Apr 13 '11 at 13:27
    
I've added some details to my answer Jack. Give it a try and let me know if it works for you. I am going to look at that UTF8 thing and I'll update when I get it figured out. –  Mike Williamson Apr 13 '11 at 14:55
    
Thanks Mike, I'll check that out today –  Jack Kinsella Apr 14 '11 at 9:23
    
Many thanks for the answer. I'm new to heroku and postgres and wasn't sure how this was accomplished –  Patrick O'Doherty May 15 '12 at 13:46
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I created a shell script that automates this process (based on Mike Williamson's answer).

https://gist.github.com/921535

#!/bin/bash

# Best use case is to create a file "update_local_db.sh" in your project folder and then     
# call the command with bash update_local_db

# Follow me: @jackkinsella

function LastBackupName () { 
  heroku pgbackups | tail -n 1 | cut -d"|" -f 1
}

# This part assumes you have a low limit on no. of backups allowed
old_backup=$(LastBackupName)
heroku pgbackups:destroy $old_backup 

heroku pgbackups:capture 
new_backup=$(LastBackupName)
curl $(heroku pgbackups:url $new_backup) > temporary_backup.dump
pg_restore --verbose --clean --no-acl --no-owner -h localhost -U REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_USER -d REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_DB_NAME temporary_backup.dump 
rm -f temporary_backup.dump
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Just what I was looking for! Thanks!!! –  B Seven Aug 5 '11 at 17:50
2  
Great script, so much faster than db:pull and a solution to the problem of not finding taps. I'm getting the output of heroku pgbackups separated by spaces rather than "|" so need to use 'cut -d" " . I'd also prefer to destroy my old Heroku backup after I save a new one, rather than before. Since Heroku now has a liberal policy on saving backups, we can skip the deletion entirely. –  Mike Blyth Aug 21 '12 at 7:48
    
I had to change the delimiter to a space. ie. heroku pgbackups | tail -n 1 | cut -d" " -f 1 –  joshs Jan 15 '13 at 17:16
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Mike's correct - PGBackups is the way to do this. When you create a backup with PGBackups, you get access to a standard pg_dump file. Here's the relevant section of the Dev Center PGBackups article.

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