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I wrote this check in C# to perform some value checking:

           if ((x <= 20 && y <= 5) || (x <= 30 && y <= 10) ||
           (x <= 50 && y <= 15) || (x <= 70 && y <= 20) ||
           (x <= 70 && y <= 30))
             {
                // do something
              }

I'm in the process to learn LINQ, and I would like to change the above code to use LINQ,

If you submit a code, can you please add some comment to explain the conversion.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you really wanted to use LINQ, one way would be to store a collection of tuples that represented each of the cases (upper-bounds) and then use the Enumerable.Any method to test if an (x, y) pair met any of the possible conditions.

Example (in reality, you can create the collection once and give it longer lifetime, perhaps through a field-reference):

var bounds = new Dictionary<int, int>
{
    {20, 5},
    {30, 10},
    {50, 15},
    {70, 20},
    {70, 30}
}.Select(kvp => new { XUpperBound = kvp.Key, YUpperBound = kvp.Value });


if (bounds.Any(tuple => x <= tuple.XUpperBound && y <= tuple.YUpperBound))
{
    ...
}
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So...move overhead, longer, and more difficult to read, all for the sake of using the Select statement? –  Adam Robinson Apr 13 '11 at 13:59
2  
@Adam Oh come on. It's answering the original question ;) +1 for a creative answer –  Dolbz Apr 13 '11 at 14:02
    
It's definitely a case of "LINQ doesn't help here and can make it uglier" but an interesting solution to an academic problem. –  Tom Apr 13 '11 at 14:05
    
@Adam: The Select isn't important, it's only to turn the KVPs into a more meaningful tuple-wrapper. You can get rid of it and do kvp => x <= kvp.Key && y <= kvp.Value if you want. The answer is about using Any instead of a bunch of ||s. I'm not claiming that I would write the code this way, but the OP did ask for a LINQ solution. –  Ani Apr 13 '11 at 14:08
    
@All: I give! +1, good answer to the question. –  Adam Robinson Apr 13 '11 at 14:10

LINQ doesn't have anything to do with the code that you've posted. Since the numbers you've chosen seem to be largely arbitrary, I don't see a way of reducing that statement any further.

To make it look better, just format the code:

if  (
    (x <= 20 && y <= 5) || 
    (x <= 30 && y <= 10) ||
    (x <= 50 && y <= 15) || 
    (x <= 70 && y <= 20) ||
    (x <= 70 && y <= 30)
    )
        {
            // do something
        }

This should make your pairs clear, make it easy to add conditions, while not adding the overhead of LINQ just for the sake of using it.

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Ok, any other way to enhance the code? –  Mark Apr 13 '11 at 14:02
    
@Mark: What needs enhancing? The code is clear, though x and y are decidedly oblique variable names. –  Adam Robinson Apr 13 '11 at 14:04
    
What if I need to change the numbers to compare to, or when there is a need to add more pairs comparison? –  Mark Apr 13 '11 at 14:06
    
@Mark: I think that can be solved through formatting rather than changing to something like LINQ. See my edit. –  Adam Robinson Apr 13 '11 at 14:11
    
Thanks, I actually did end up using the same code, but because I actually did ask for LINQ, I selected Ani as an answer. –  Mark Apr 13 '11 at 14:15

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