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I'm currently having a strange issue whereby all browsers except from Google Chrome are registering a call to IsPostback within a Page_Load event as true when I click an asp.net button which simply posts back to the same page.

This has led me to try and discover how the IsPostback property within an ASP .Net page is technically implemented, something I'm struggling to find.

My thoughts to date are that it could be related to the following;

  • The request VERB type is POST rather than GET.
  • The hidden input containing the Viewstate information has no information present and therefore no previously submitted control information is available.
  • The http referer in the request headers is the same as the current URL.

Can anyone provide an actual breakdown of the conditions used to determine the IsPostback boolean property?

Note: I'm looking for the actual implementation rather than perceptions / theory as I'm hoping to use this to actively resolve an issue. I've also searched MSDN and to date cannot find any technical article accurately covering the mechanism.

Thanks in advance, Brian.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The page looks for the existence of a __PREVIOUSPAGE form value.

From Reflector:

public bool IsPostBack
{
    get
    {   //_requestValueCollection = Form or Querystring name/value pairs
        if (this._requestValueCollection == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        //_isCrossPagePostBack = _requestValueCollection["__PREVIOUSPAGE"] != null
        if (this._isCrossPagePostBack)
        {
            return true;
        }

        //_pageFlags[8] = this._requestValueCollection["__PREVIOUSPAGE"] == null
        if (this._pageFlags[8])
        {
            return false;
        }

        return (   ((this.Context.ServerExecuteDepth <= 0) 
                || (   (this.Context.Handler != null) 
                    && !(base.GetType() != this.Context.Handler.GetType())))
                && !this._fPageLayoutChanged);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reflected output, upvoted. I suppose I'm still looking for a more definitive yet higher level description though. This shows me the actual property implementation but doesn't provide knowledge of how ASP .Net interacts with the browser request to determine IsPostback. An example being "this._pageFlags[8]", what does this particularly mean in terms of the overall mechanism? –  Brian Scott Apr 13 '11 at 14:14
    
I added comments. –  Mark Cidade Apr 13 '11 at 14:32
    
Fantastic, thanks for that. Appreciate the time both yourself and Prescott have taken. –  Brian Scott Apr 13 '11 at 14:39

Postback actually works fairly simply by submitting the form to itself (for the most part). The javascript code is actually put on your page:

<input type="hidden" name="__EVENTTARGET" id="__EVENTTARGET" value="" />
<input type="hidden" name="__EVENTARGUMENT" id="__EVENTARGUMENT" value="" />

function __doPostBack(eventTarget, eventArgument) {
    if (!theForm.onsubmit || (theForm.onsubmit() != false)) {
        theForm.__EVENTTARGET.value = eventTarget;
        theForm.__EVENTARGUMENT.value = eventArgument;
        theForm.submit();
    }
}

Marks answer shows you the server side code that is run.

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Thanks, that helps a little more with my understanding. –  Brian Scott Apr 13 '11 at 14:25

Is Postback is implemented as such (using Reflector):

public bool get_IsPostBack()
{
    if (this._requestValueCollection == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if (this._isCrossPagePostBack)
    {
        return true;
    }
    if (this._pageFlags[8])
    {
        return false;
    }
    return (((this.Context.ServerExecuteDepth <= 0) || ((this.Context.Handler != null) && !(base.GetType() != this.Context.Handler.GetType()))) && !this._fPageLayoutChanged);
}

So unless you take into account all these parameters, it will not be possible to trace it.

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