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Basically I have in my MainViewModel.cs:

ObservableCollection<TabItem> MyTabs { get; private set; }

However, I need to somehow be able to not only create the tabs, but have the tabs content be loaded and linked to their appropriate viewmodels while maintaining MVVM.

Basically, how can I get a usercontrol to be loaded as the content of a tabitem AND have that usercontrol wired up to an appropriate viewmodel. The part that makes this difficult is the ViewModel is not supposed to construct the actual view items, right? Or can it?

Basically, would this be MVVM appropriate:

UserControl address = new AddressControl();
NotificationObject vm = new AddressViewModel();
address.DataContext = vm;
MyTabs[0] = new TabItem()
{
    Content = address;
}

I only ask because well, i'm constructing a View (AddressControl) from within a ViewModel, which to me sounds like a MVVM no-no.

share|improve this question
    
+1 good question. In the PRISM guides they don't really cover this case. –  Markus Hütter Apr 13 '11 at 15:05
    
They didn't cover it in the manual, but they did in the reference implementation. –  PVitt Apr 27 '11 at 11:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 32 down vote accepted

This isn't MVVM. You should not be creating UI elements in your view model.

You should be binding the ItemsSource of the Tab to your ObservableCollection, and that should hold models with information about the tabs that should be created.

Here are the VM and the model which represents a tab page:

public sealed class ViewModel
{
    public ObservableCollection<TabItem> Tabs {get;set;}
    public ViewModel()
    {
        Tabs = new ObservableCollection<TabItem>();
        Tabs.Add(new TabItem { Header = "One", Content = "One's content" });
        Tabs.Add(new TabItem { Header = "Two", Content = "Two's content" });
    }
}
public sealed class TabItem
{
    public string Header { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }
}

And here is how the bindings look in the window:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication12.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.DataContext>
        <ViewModel
            xmlns="clr-namespace:WpfApplication12" />
    </Window.DataContext>
    <TabControl
        ItemsSource="{Binding Tabs}">
        <TabControl.ItemTemplate>
            <!-- this is the header template-->
            <DataTemplate>
                <TextBlock
                    Text="{Binding Header}" />
            </DataTemplate>
        </TabControl.ItemTemplate>
        <TabControl.ContentTemplate>
            <!-- this is the body of the TabItem template-->
            <DataTemplate>
                <TextBlock
                    Text="{Binding Content}" />
            </DataTemplate>
        </TabControl.ContentTemplate>
    </TabControl>
</Window>

Oh look, a UserControl:

<TabControl
    ItemsSource="{Binding Tabs}">
    <TabControl.ItemTemplate>
        <!-- this is the header template-->
        <DataTemplate>
            <TextBlock
                Text="{Binding Header}" />
        </DataTemplate>
    </TabControl.ItemTemplate>
    <TabControl.ContentTemplate>
        <!-- this is the body of the TabItem template-->
        <DataTemplate>
            <MyUserControl xmlns="clr-namespace:WpfApplication12" />
        </DataTemplate>
    </TabControl.ContentTemplate>
</TabControl>
share|improve this answer
2  
Well, the content of a tab is a usercontrol though, so wouldn't I still be making new UI instance in my ViewModel? –  michael Apr 13 '11 at 16:44
1  
@michael: In your example, you are actually creating a UI element in your ViewModel. In my example, I am creating a Model of type TabItem. In your example, the TabControl (hypothetically) would take the TabItems instantiated by your ViewModel and display them to the user. In mine, it sees its ItemsSource, creates a tab for each one, and binds the parts of each tab according to the configuration of the element in the View and the types of items it is displaying. Its a major distinction. Do you understand it? –  Will Apr 13 '11 at 17:25
1  
@Will: Well, In your example wouldn't I still have to do Tabs.Add(new TabItem { Header = "One", Content = new AddressView() }); which still is declaring a new UI control (AddressView) in the ViewModel. I guess I'm just having a hard time seeing how this avoids creating an instance of the AddressView in the ViewModel. –  michael Apr 13 '11 at 17:44
2  
It took awhile to mark this as the answer, but I finally figured out what you meant by the DataTemplates part. WPF automatically wires up the Views/ViewModels based upon the type of ViewModel in the tab as long as I define the DataTemplate. –  michael Sep 23 '11 at 17:18
1  
@Will be thankful that i didn't pass judgement on the use of sealed ;) –  Gusdor Nov 5 at 14:31

In Prism you usually make the tab control a region so that you don't have to take control over the bound tab page collection.

<TabControl 
    x:Name="MainRegionHost"
    Regions:RegionManager.RegionName="MainRegion" 
    />

Now the views can be added via registering itself into the region MainRegion:

RegionManager.RegisterViewWithRegion( "MainRegion", 
    ( ) => Container.Resolve<IMyViewModel>( ).View );

And here you can see a speciality of Prism. The View is instanciated by the ViewModel. In my case I resolve the ViewModel throught a Inversion of Control container (e.g. Unity or MEF). The ViewModel gets the View injected via constructor injection and sets itself as the View's data context.

The alternative is to register the view's type into the region controller:

RegionManager.RegisterViewWithRegion( "MainRegion", typeof( MyView ) );

Using this approach allows you to create the views later during runtime, e.g. by a controller:

IRegion region = this._regionManager.Regions["MainRegion"];

object mainView = region.GetView( MainViewName );
if ( mainView == null )
{
    var view = _container.ResolveSessionRelatedView<MainView>( );
    region.Add( view, MainViewName );
}

Because you have registered the View's type, the view is placed into the correct region.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for posting an answer using PRISM –  Markus Hütter Apr 17 '11 at 13:23

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