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For some reason I thought this was valid under the memory management naming rules:

Bar *bar = [Bar new];
[Foo fooWithNewBar:bar];
// no need to release bar, foo took ownership

However now I'm running my static analysis, it thinks there's a potential leak everytime I did this.

I see there is __attribute((ns_consumed)) which I could use on the fooWithNewBar declaration. But Xcode 4.0.1's Clang does not yet support this attribute.

So, there's no such naming pattern?

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Thanks everyone who answered so far and described basic memory management in Cocoa and the rules of it. I didn't ask for any of that. I wanted to know if there was an acceptable pattern for transferring ownership in an initializer. My reasons for this are stylistic. I am trying to save repeated typing of autorelease in lines that are already too long and very numerous in this codebase, and rewriting Bar to use +(id)className initializers is not an easy undertaking as it has 50 subclasses. –  mxcl Apr 13 '11 at 17:02
    
Annoying subtlety: if Foo is nil, it cannot take ownership! For instance methods, this is fairly obvious; for class methods, this might happen if you're e.g. using a class in iOS 6 but running on iOS 5. It's not a generally safe thing to do; I'd avoid it. –  tc. Jun 7 '13 at 19:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I also think there’s no naming pattern corresponding to ns_consumed in your case. Naming patterns are largely driven by NeXTSTEP/Apple and I can’t think of a method in Apple’s frameworks with the same semantics you want.

Note, however, that you can tell Xcode to use a more recent version of Clang Static Analyser that supports the ns_consumed attribute, which was released with checker-254.

I’m using checker-256 (released today, but any version >= 254 should work) and I’ve just tried the following:

// MyClass.h
#ifndef __has_feature      // Optional.
#define __has_feature(x) 0 // Compatibility with non-clang compilers.
#endif

#ifndef NS_CONSUMED
#if __has_feature(attribute_ns_consumed)
#define NS_CONSUMED __attribute__((ns_consumed))
#else
#define NS_CONSUMED
#endif
#endif

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
@private
    NSString *_string;
}
+ (MyClass *)myClassWithNewStringConsumed:(NSString *) NS_CONSUMED string NS_RETURNS_RETAINED;
+ (MyClass *)myClassWithNewString:(NSString *)string NS_RETURNS_RETAINED;
@end

and

// MyClass.m
#import "MyClass.h"

@implementation MyClass

+ (MyClass *)myClassWithNewStringConsumed:(NSString *)string {
    MyClass *o = [MyClass new];
    if (o) o->_string = string;
    return o;
}

+ (MyClass *)myClassWithNewString:(NSString *)string {
    MyClass *o = [MyClass new];
    if (o) o->_string = string;
    return o;
}

@end

This code gives a static analyser warning for a potential leak of the string stored in s:

// SomewhereElse.m
NSString *s = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%d",
    [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processIdentifier]];
MyClass *o = [MyClass myClassWithNewString:s];
[o release];

whereas this code, which uses the method parameter with an ns_consumed attribute, doesn’t give a static analyser warning:

// SomewhereElse.m
NSString *s = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%d",
    [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processIdentifier]];
MyClass *o = [MyClass myClassWithNewStringConsumed:s];
[o release];
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There is no such pattern. Wherever I think I read about it, I didn't.

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If you're trying to use this for assign properties, you still need to release the object you created at some point in your code. –  kubi Apr 13 '11 at 15:05
    
Yeah, I'm not trying to use this for assign properties, I was just using that as example of how I wanted the Foo initializer to deal with the receiving portion of taking the Bar instance. –  mxcl Apr 13 '11 at 17:04
Bar *bar = [Bar new];

You own bar.

[Foo fooWithNewBar:bar];

If this wants to own bar, it should be retaining it. That doesn't relinquish your ownership, so you still have to release bar.

I've never seen the pattern you're using.

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I'm looking for a naming pattern that transfers ownership, as though it was assigned to a (assign) property later. I understand the Cocoa memory ownership rules that you describe. –  mxcl Apr 13 '11 at 14:56

Foo took an interest in Bar, but *bar still has interest until [bar release] that interest.

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2  
I don't think you understood the question. –  mxcl Apr 13 '11 at 14:33
    
new is just a substitute for alloc/init –  Black Frog Apr 13 '11 at 14:36
5  
I still don't think you understand the question. –  mxcl Apr 13 '11 at 14:57

Ownership in Objective-C reference-counted memory management is C++ share_ptr, rather than auto_ptr style. In other words, you don't transfer ownership to the Foo instance. Rather the Foo instance declares a share of ownerhsip in your Bar instance (leaving you, the caller of [Bar new] with a share of ownership as well). You always need to relinquish your ownership share of an instance before it may be deallocated. Thus, your example should be

Bar *bar = [[Bar alloc] init]; //Most Obj-C devs prefer alloc/init. When in Rome...
[Foo fooWithNewBar:[bar autorelease]]; //relinquish ownership of bar

Note that you have to use -autorelease rather than -release to relinquish your ownership share because Foo needs a chance to claim an ownership stake before bar is deallocated.

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