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I'm learning Erlang and decided to implement bubble sort in it, it took me some effort and in result i've succeded, but i see that my way of thinking is incorrect, is there more effecient way to implement it or not?

bubble_sort(L) ->
if 
length(L) > 1 ->
    SL=bubble_sort_p(L),
    bubble_sort(lists:sublist(SL,1,length(SL)-1)) ++ [lists:last(SL)];
true -> L
end.

bubble_sort_p([]) -> [];    
bubble_sort_p([F | R]) ->
    case length(R) > 0 of
        true -> case F > hd(R) of
                true ->  [hd(R)] ++ bubble_sort_p([F|tl(R)]);
                false -> [F] ++ bubble_sort_p([hd(R)|tl(R)])
            end;
        false -> [F]
    end.
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1  
...submitted an incomplete question –  Matt Ball Apr 13 '11 at 14:41
    
sorry, i've accidently submitted it, corrected now –  Troydm Apr 13 '11 at 14:45
    
Your if length(L) > 1 destroys performance. It has to traverse the whole list. You are better off at pattern matching on the empty list and then handling it individually. Merge-sort is usually a better idea in functional languages. It is faster and can be written in a stable/smooth fashion as easily, but it is much faster than what you have here. –  I GIVE CRAP ANSWERS Apr 14 '11 at 15:56
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Allow me to re-write your code in a much more readable fashion (without changing anything about the semantics):

bubble_sort(L) when length(L) =< 1 ->
    L;
bubble_sort(L) ->
    SL = bubble_sort_p(L),
    bubble_sort(lists:sublist(SL,1,length(SL)-1)) ++ [lists:last(SL)].

bubble_sort_p([])  ->
    [];
bubble_sort_p([F]) ->
    [F];
bubble_sort_p([F,G|T]) when F > G ->
    [G|bubble_sort_p([F|T])];
bubble_sort_p([F,G|T]) ->
    [F|bubble_sort_p([G|T])].

This should allow for much easier contemplation of the things actually going on in the program.

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bubble_sort_p([F,G|T]) when G < F is correct, but yup it's ok, but what i'm interested in more alternative ways to implement it, Are there any? –  Troydm Apr 13 '11 at 18:50
    
This answer was not intended to be an actual "answer", but to help with the finding of alternative ways. It is much better readable and thus should cause less headaches for people who might want to examine the "efficiency" of the algorithm. Even though I have no idea how "efficient" and "bubblesort" would ever end up in the same sentence except for "bubblesort is not efficient, use a better algorithm". –  ndim Apr 13 '11 at 20:49
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The implementation from the top of my head would be:

bubble_sort(L) -> bubble_sort(L, [], false).

bubble_sort([A, B | T], Acc, _) when A > B ->
  bubble_sort([A | T], [B | Acc], true);
bubble_sort([A, B | T], Acc, Tainted) ->
  bubble_sort([B | T], [A | Acc], Tainted);
bubble_sort([A | T], Acc, Tainted) ->
  bubble_sort(T, [A | Acc], Tainted);
bubble_sort([], Acc, true) ->
  bubble_sort(lists:reverse(Acc));
bubble_sort([], Acc, false) ->
  lists:reverse(Acc).

If we are talking efficiency, we obvioulsy should not go for bubble sort in the first place.

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hard to read for me but quite interesting thx for answer, efficiency is irrelevant in this topic –  Troydm Apr 13 '11 at 21:07
    
Ok.. ;) One of the keys to really grasp functional programming is to be able to follow recursive patterns. This is actually not by-the-book bubble sort, since [A,B|T] will go on with [A|T] and put B to the result. Which means that A would keep on traveling in the list in same pass as long as it is bigger. Oh, and I think you stated "is there more effecient way to implement it or not?" in the Q.. :) –  E Dominique Apr 14 '11 at 5:46
    
by efficiency i mean less lines of code and not algorithm efficiency actually :) –  Troydm Apr 14 '11 at 6:15
2  
+1 for being tail recursive –  Adam Lindberg Apr 14 '11 at 7:16
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And employing lists:foldr:

bubble(List) ->
    Step = fun
              (E,{S,[]}) -> {S,[E]};
              (E,{_,[X|XS]}) when E > X -> {swapped,[X|[E|XS]]};
              (E,{S,XS}) -> {S,[E|XS]}
           end,
    case lists:foldr(Step, {intact,[]}, List) of
        {intact,XS} -> XS;
        {swapped,XS} -> bubble(XS)
    end.
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There is an answer at http://en.literateprograms.org/Bubble_sort_%28Erlang%29

-module(bubblesort).
-export([sort/1]).
-import(lists, [reverse/1]).

sort(L) -> sort(L, [], true).
sort([], L, true) -> reverse(L);
sort([], L, false) -> sort(reverse(L), [], true);
sort([ X, Y | T ], L, _) when X > Y ->
sort([ X | T ], [ Y | L ], false);
sort([ X | T ], L, Halt) -> sort(T, [ X | L ], Halt).

An example for sorting 2,4,3,5,1

sort([2,4,3,5,1])

round 1

=> sort([2,4,3,5,1], [], true)

=> sort([4,3,5,1], [2], true)

=> sort([4,5,1], [3,2], false)

=> sort([5,1], [4,3,2], false)

=> sort([5], [1,4,3,2], false)

=> sort([], [5,1,4,3,2], false)

=> sort([2,3,4,1,5], [], true)

round 2

=> sort([3,4,1,5], [2], true)

=> sort([4,1,5], [3,2], true)

=> sort([4,5], [1,3,2], false)

=> sort([5], [4,1,3,2], false)

=> sort([], [5,4,1,3,2], false)

=> sort([2,3,1,4,5], [], true)

round 3

=> sort([3,1,4,5], [2], true)

=> sort([3,4,5], [1,2], false)

=> sort([4,5], [3,1,2], false)

=> sort([5], [4,3,1,2], false)

=> sort([], [5,4,3,1,2], false)

=> sort([2,1,3,4,5], true)

round 4

=> sort([2,3,4,5], [1], false)

=> sort([3,4,5], [2,1], false)

=> sort([4,5], [3,2,1], false)

=> sort([5], [4,3,2,1], false)

=> sort([], [5,4,3,2,1], false)

=> sort([1,2,3,4,5], [], true)

round 5

=> sort([2,3,4,5], [1], true)

=> sort([3,4,5],[2,1], true)

=> sort([4,5],[3,2,1], true)

=> sort([5],[4,3,2,1], true)

=> sort([], [5,4,3,2,1], true)

=> [1,2,3,4,5]

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-module(bubbleSort).
-compile(export_all).
-include_lib("eunit/include/eunit.hrl").

sort(L) ->
    sort(L, length(L), []).

sort(_L, 0, _Res) -> [];
sort([H | _T], 1, Res) -> [H | Res];
sort(L, Len, Res) ->
    T1 = lists:sublist(L, 1, Len),
    T2 = inner_sort(T1, []),
    Last = lists:last(T2),
   sort(T2, Len - 1, [Last | Res]).

inner_sort([A, B], Res) when (A < B)->
    Res ++ [A, B];
inner_sort([A, B], Res) ->
    Res ++ [B, A];
inner_sort([A, B | T], Res) when (A < B) ->
    inner_sort([B | T], Res ++ [A]);
inner_sort([A, B | T], Res) ->
    inner_sort([A | T], Res ++ [B]).

test()->
    L = [5, 3, -1, 10, 6, 100, 99],
    ?assert(sort([])  =:= []),
    ?assert(sort([1]) =:= [1]),
    ?assert(sort([1, 2, 3, 4]) =:= [1, 2, 3, 4]),
    ?assert(sort([10, 5, 3, 2, 1]) =:= [1, 2, 3, 5, 10]),
    ?assert(sort(L) =:= [-1, 3, 5, 6, 10, 99, 100]).
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