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I'm doing a lot of different things with manipulating arrays without vectors, I was wondering if any one could help me with shifting elements in an array and expanding an array while initializing the new space with elements. I feel like I'm very close to completing this code, but I'm hitting a block.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


// Function prototypes
int *reverse(int *, int);
int *expand(int *, int); 
int *shift(int *, int); 
void display(int[], int);
void display2(int[], int);
void display3(int[], int);


int main()
{
    int const SIZE = 5;
    int myArray [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    int myArray2 [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    int myArray3 [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

    int *arraPtr;
    int *arraPtr2;
    int *arraPtr3;

    arraPtr = reverse(myArray, SIZE);

    display(myArray, SIZE);

    arraPtr2 = expand(myArray2, SIZE);

    display2(myArray2, SIZE);

    arraPtr3 = shift(myArray3, SIZE);

    display3(myArray3, SIZE);

    delete [] arraPtr;
    delete [] arraPtr2;
    delete [] arraPtr3;


    return 0;
}



int *reverse(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *copyArray;
    int posChange;

    if( size < 0)
        return NULL;

    copyArray = new int[size];

    for (int index = 0; index < --size; index++)
    {
            posChange = arr[index];
            arr[index] = arr[size];
            arr[size] = posChange;

    }
    return copyArray;

}


int *expand(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;

        newArray = new int[size * 2];
memcpy( newArray, arr, size * sizeof(int));
for (int index = size; index < (size*2); index++)
    newArray[index] = 0;
return newArray;




}

int *shift(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;
    newArray = arr;
    newArray = new int [size + 1];
    for (int index = 5; index > 0; index--)
        newArray[index] = newArray[index - 1];

return newArray;


}

void display(int arr[], int size)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    {
        cout << arr[index] << " ";
    }

        cout << endl;
}

void display2(int arr[], int size)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    {
        cout << arr[index] << "  ";
    }
        cout << endl;

}

void display3(int arr[], int size)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    {
        cout <<arr[index] << "  ";
    }
        cout << endl;

}
share|improve this question
    
It looks like your newArray variable inside shift should be an int pointer, but given you're not actually using shift at all in the rest of the code it probably doesn't matter. You should probably update it though. –  A. Murray Apr 13 '11 at 15:49
    
What exactly is the problem? Do you get any errors? What doesn't work as expected? In which way doesn't it work as expected? –  sth Apr 13 '11 at 15:49
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are only two compile error: int newArray; should be int* newArray; and #include <cstring> is missing (necessary for memcpy())

Also, the line display(myArray, SIZE); was probably meant to be display(arraPtr, SIZE); and likewise display2(myArray2, SIZE); -- otherwise you're only displaying the original arrays, not the results of your function calls.

However, this could benefit from the safer and more generic C++ algorithms, std::copy() and std::reverse_copy() at least:

int *reverse(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *copyArray = new int[size];
    std::reverse_copy(arr, arr+size, copyArray);
    return copyArray;
}
int *expand(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray = new int[size * 2]();
    std::copy(arr, arr+size, newArray);
    return newArray;
}
int *shift(int *arr, int size)
{
    int* newArray = new int [size + 1]();
    std::copy(arr, arr+size, newArray+1);
    return newArray;
}

full program: https://ideone.com/RNFiV

share|improve this answer
    
I was editing my solution before reading yours, but I will post it anyway since I don't use generic algorithms so I think mine is better from a learning point of view, although of course yours is much better for real code. –  machielo Apr 13 '11 at 16:03
    
@machielo sure, given the vagueness of the problem statement, either answer could be what OP is looking for. –  Cubbi Apr 13 '11 at 16:17
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This is mostly C code but I'll try to give you some tips on the methods of what you're doing more than the syntax:

In your reverse function, you never actually put anything into the new array. Instead of doing some swapping in the for loop, you can just run through the original loop backwards putting the elements into the new array.

In the expand function it looks like you're trying to do two opposite things, copy the memory from the input array to the new one and then overwrite the new array with all zeros. If you want to copy the memory manually you need to have the loop only go the original array copying its values into the new array (and not go through double the size of the original array or else you'll walk off the end of it!). If you want to use memcpy then get rid of the for loop.

I'm not sure what you want the shift function to do but it pretty much just copies the array now.

share|improve this answer
    
well i changed a few things after i posted the question... –  Shimar Apr 13 '11 at 15:59
    
@Shimar looks like a few things may have been fixed but there's still more work to do! –  DShook Apr 13 '11 at 16:43
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I don't know exactly what did you want to accomplish but I think it was something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring> // Needed to compile on most compilers(memcpy), dunno in yours
using namespace std;


// Function prototypes
int *reverse(int *, int);
int *expand(int *, int); 
int *shift(int *, int); 
void display(int[], int);
void display2(int[], int);


int main()
{
    int const SIZE = 5;
    int myArray [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    int myArray2 [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    int myArray3 [SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

    int *arraPtr;
    int *arraPtr2;

    arraPtr = reverse(myArray, SIZE);

    display(arraPtr, SIZE);

    arraPtr2 = expand(myArray2, SIZE);

    display2(arraPtr2, SIZE * 2);

    delete [] arraPtr;
    delete [] arraPtr2;


    return 0;
}



int *reverse(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *copyArray;
    int posChange;

    if( size < 0)
        return NULL;

    copyArray = new int[size];

    for (int index = 0; index <= --size; index++)
    {
            posChange = arr[index];
            copyArray[index] = arr[size];
            copyArray[size] = posChange;

    }
    return copyArray;

}


int *expand(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;

    newArray = new int[size * 2];
    memcpy( newArray, arr, size * sizeof(int));
    for (int index = size; index < (size*2); index++)
        newArray[index] = 0;
    return newArray;
}

int *shift(int *arr, int size)
{
    int *newArray;
    newArray = new int [size + 1];
    memcpy( newArray, arr, size * sizeof(int));


return newArray;


}

void display(int arr[], int size)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    {
        cout << endl << arr[index] << " ";
    }
}

void display2(int arr[], int size)
{
    for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    {
        cout << arr[index] << " ";
    }
}

As a side note, if you have problems with this kind of stuff you should take a look at any good C resource that talks about pointers and pointer arithmetics, it will come in handy when you have to do low level C++ code.

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