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I have a very annoying problem on the application I've been contracted to work in.

The database structure, which I can't modify for compatibility reasons is a mess. It's basically a many-to-many-to-many-to-many-to-bang-your-head-on-the-desk relationship. It goes like this:

contact

---------------------------
| contact_id | name | ... |
---------------------------
| 1          | foo  |     |
---------------------------

metadefinition

-----------------------------
| metadefinition_id | name  |
-----------------------------
| 1                 | title |
-----------------------------
| 2                 | job   |
-----------------------------

contact_metadata

----------------------------
| contact_id | metadata_id |
----------------------------
| 1          | 1           |
----------------------------
| 1          | 2           |
----------------------------

metadata

-------------------------------------------
| metadata_id | metadefinition_id | value |
-------------------------------------------
| 1           | 1                 | mrs   |
-------------------------------------------
| 2           | 2                 | coder |
-------------------------------------------

So, for a single contact, I want to search on all this and obtain something like this:

-----------------------------------------------------
| contact_id | name | metadata.title | metadata.job |
-----------------------------------------------------
| 1          | foo  | mrs            | coder        |
-----------------------------------------------------

So now what I've tried so far. I can fetch the list of metadefinition in advance, that's not really an issue. So I build a query like this:

SELECT contact.*,m1.value AS `metadata.title` FROM contact
   LEFT JOIN contact_metadata ON contact.contact_id = contact_metadata.contact_id
   LEFT JOIN metadata m1 ON contact_metadata.metadata_id = m1.metadata_id AND m1.metadefinition_id = 1
   GROUP BY contact_id

This works for a single metadefinition, I get something like this:

--------------------------------------
| contact_id | name | metadata.title |
--------------------------------------
| 1          | foo  | mrs            |
--------------------------------------

If I try with two, however:

SELECT contact.*,m1.value AS `metadata.title`,m2.value AS `metadata.job` FROM contact
   LEFT JOIN contact_metadata ON contact.contact_id = contact_metadata.contact_id
   LEFT JOIN metadata m1 ON contact_metadata.metadata_id = m1.metadata_id AND m1.metadefinition_id = 1
   LEFT JOIN metadata m2 ON contact_metadata.metadata_id = m2.metadata_id AND m2.metadefinition_id = 2
   GROUP BY contact_id

I get:

-----------------------------------------------------
| contact_id | name | metadata.title | metadata.job |
-----------------------------------------------------
| 1          | foo  | mrs            | NULL         |
-----------------------------------------------------

If I remove the GROUP BY clause, of course, I get:

-----------------------------------------------------
| contact_id | name | metadata.title | metadata.job |
-----------------------------------------------------
| 1          | foo  | mrs            | NULL         |
-----------------------------------------------------
| 1          | foo  | NULL           | coder        |
-----------------------------------------------------

I'm open to anything as long as the query times are relatively acceptable (considering the structure, if it takes 10 seconds for 100000 records it's better than nothing)

Will it be temporary tables, stored procedures, I don't care, as long as I don't have to change the actual database structure.

Trust me, when it'll be the time to remodel, it'll be my pleasure to take this whole thing down.

Is there a solution to this, is it possible?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Since MySQL doesn't directly support pivot tables, you are going to have to make views to manually create the pivots (examples). Keep in mind though that there is nothing wrong with this data structure (see normalization). It is perfectly flexible, yet can be hard to work with in some instances. –  Kevin Peno Apr 13 '11 at 16:13
1  
You haven't given us enough information to figure out what it is you're actually trying to do. I don't see a problem with the table structure. And those results look like I would expect them to. What are you trying to represent in your results? –  Neil D Apr 13 '11 at 16:22
    
@Neil D: It seems you didn't read the entire question. All the information I have is there: DB structure, actual results, expected results. If you read carefully, you can clearly see that the result I get is not what I want. As for the DB structure, it is clearly overkill for what it's trying to do. –  netcoder Apr 13 '11 at 16:39
    
@netcoder: If you read the entire question you can clearly see that the expected results for the second query aren't there, you just have the results you actually got. –  Neil D Apr 13 '11 at 16:41
    
@Neil, he stuck the expected results in the middle of the question: So, for a single contact, I want to search on all this and obtain something like this –  Kevin Peno Apr 13 '11 at 16:44
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd use a pair of correlated sub-queies. Something like

SELECT c.*
  ,( Select value from metadata m1 
       INNER JOIN contact_metadata cm 
       on cm.metadata_id = m1.metadata_id 
     WHERE m1.metadefinition_id = 1 
       AND cm.contact_id = c.contact_id )AS `metadata.title`
  ,( Select value from metadata m1 
       INNER JOIN contact_metadata cm 
       ON cm.metadata_id = m1.metadata_id 
     WHERE m1.metadefinition_id = 2 
       AND cm.contact_id = c.contact_id )AS `metadata.job`
FROM contact c
WHERE c.contact_id = 1
share|improve this answer
    
@Kevin Peno Thanks for the edit dude. –  JustABitOfCode Apr 13 '11 at 16:23
    
np :) –  Kevin Peno Apr 13 '11 at 16:24
    
Thanks that did it. Now I need to figure out how to make this work in Zend_Db... Ugh. At least that problem's fixed. –  netcoder Apr 13 '11 at 18:38
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You'll need to fetch each metadata item (title, job etc.) as a separate subquery, and then join on contact_id to bring these metadata items together for each contact. Like this:

SELECT contact.*, metadata_title, metadata_job FROM contact 
INNER JOIN 
(SELECT contact_id,m.value AS `metadata_title` FROM contact_metadata 
   LEFT JOIN metadata m ON contact_metadata.metadata_id = m.metadata_id AND m.metadefinition_id = 1) metaTitle ON metaTitle.contact_id=contact.contact_id
INNER JOIN 
(SELECT contact_id,m.value AS `metadata_job` FROM contact_metadata 
   LEFT JOIN metadata m ON contact_metadata.metadata_id = m.metadata_id AND m.metadefinition_id = 2) metaJob ON (metaJob.contact_id=contact.contact_id)

If you want to allow for the possibility of a client not having a particular metadata item, use LEFT JOINs instead, as at present, the query will only return clients that have both a job and a title defined.

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+1, Make it a VIEW and query it just like a table. –  Kevin Peno Apr 13 '11 at 16:18
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Now that I've finally read the question properly, here's my two cents, for what's it's worth (no pun intended).

SELECT contact.contact_id, contact.name, m1.value AS 'metadata.title', m2.value AS 'metadata.job'     
FROM dbo.contact
INNER JOIN dbo.contact_metadata cm1 ON cm1.contact_id = cm1.contact_id
INNER JOIN dbo.metadata m1 ON cm1.metadata_id = m1.metadata_id AND m1.metadefinition_id = 1
INNER JOIN dbo.contact_metadata cm2 ON contact.contact_id = cm2.contact_id
INNER JOIN dbo.metadata m2 ON cm2.metadata_id = m2.metadata_id AND m2.metadefinition_id = 2
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