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Lets say I have 2 lists, containing elements:

  1. values
  2. uncertainties of the values

Values are stored as exact fractions and I want to print out combined list of numerical values. For example if i have 1 element lists:

ExA = {5251/977, 19087/53};
ExB = {53/19087, 977/5251};

I want the output to be: {5.3746 ± 0.0028, 360.13 ± 0.19}, with using Err[ExA, ExB].

Basically I want uncertainty to have a element precision of 2 digits and value to have same precision as the paired uncertainty. At the moment I have:

Err[x_, \[CapitalDelta]x_]:=
  N[x] \[PlusMinus] NumberForm[N[\[CapitalDelta]x], 2];
SetAttributes[Err, Listable];

Edit: Following almost works as I want:

Err[x_, \[CapitalDelta]x_] := 
 PlusMinus[
  NumberForm[N[x], {10, 2 - MantissaExponent[\[CapitalDelta]x][[2]]}],
   NumberForm[N[\[CapitalDelta]x], 2]]
SetAttributes[Err, Listable];

If uncertainties second digit rounds to 0, then shorter version is used - I do not want that. For example 1.7007 ± 0.006 where I want 1.7007 ± 0.0060.

share|improve this question
    
@Mr.Wizard : Well, if written in scientific notation, I want the value to have same multiplier and number of decimal places, as uncertainty does. –  Margus Apr 13 '11 at 16:42
    
@Mr.Wizard : It does not work, if Err is used inside a list. –  Margus Apr 13 '11 at 16:56
    
@Mr.Wizard : I mean {Err[m, \[CapitalDelta]m], Err[t, \[CapitalDelta]t]}, does not work for example. –  Margus Apr 13 '11 at 17:11
    
Margus, I made yet another edit. Hopefully I have my head on straight this time. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 13 '11 at 18:29
    
It seems I missed your update. Back to the drawing board! :-) –  Mr.Wizard Apr 13 '11 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Improved version, inspired by Daniel's answer:

SetAttributes[Err, Listable]

Err[n_, e_] := N[n, {∞, 2 - Log10@e}] ± N[e, 2]

Testing

ExA = {5251/977, 19087/53, 850341/500000};
ExB = {53/19087, 977/5251, 151/25000};

Err[ExA, ExB]

Err[5251/977, 53/19087]
{5.3746 ± 0.0028, 360.13 ± 0.19, 1.7007 ± 0.0060}

5.3746 ± 0.0028
share|improve this answer
    
Both of your solutions work. –  Margus Apr 14 '11 at 5:18
    
Margus, thanks for the accept. Please see the improved version I just added. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 14 '11 at 8:40

Corrected version:

Can use N[...,2] on the errors, then take N[...,{Infinity,Accuracy[error]}] on the central values. THis second numericization causes the accuracy of each central value to match the accuracy of its corresponding error.

PlusMinus @@@ 
  Map[{N[#[[1]], {Infinity, Accuracy[#[[2]]]}], #[[2]]} &, 
   Transpose[{ExA, N[ExB, 2]}]]

Out[113]= {5.3746 [PlusMinus] 0.0028, 360.13 [PlusMinus] 0.19}

Daniel Lichtblau

share|improve this answer
    
@Margus See corrected version. –  Daniel Lichtblau Apr 13 '11 at 18:30

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