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I am not sure what I am doing wrong, have seen a lot of examples, but can't seem to get this working.

public static Stream Foo()
{
    var memStream = new MemoryStream();
    var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(memStream);

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
        streamWriter.WriteLine("TEST");

    memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    return memStream;
}

I am doing a simple test on this method to try and get it to pass, but no matter what, my collection count is 0.

[Test]
public void TestStreamRowCount()
{
    var stream = Foo();

    using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        var collection = new List<string>();
        string input;

        while ((input = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            collection.Add(input);

        Assert.AreEqual(6, collection.Count);
    }
}

Note: I changed some syntax above without compiling in the Test method. What is more important is the first method which seems to be returning an empty stream (my reader.ReadLine() always reads once). Not sure what I am doing wrong. Thank you.

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3 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

You are forgetting to flush your StreamWriter instance.

public static Stream Foo()
{
    var memStream = new MemoryStream();
    var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(memStream);

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
        streamWriter.WriteLine("TEST");

    streamWriter.Flush();                                   <-- need this
    memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    return memStream;
}

Also note that StreamWriter is supposed to be disposed of, since it implements IDisposable, but that in turn generates another problem, it will close the underlying MemoryStream as well.

Are you sure you want to return a MemoryStream here?

I would change the code to this:

public static byte[] Foo()
{
    using (var memStream = new MemoryStream())
    using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(memStream))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
            streamWriter.WriteLine("TEST");

        streamWriter.Flush();
        return memStream.ToArray();
    }
}

[Test]
public void TestStreamRowCount()
{
    var bytes = Foo();

    using (var stream = new MemoryStream(bytes))
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        var collection = new List<string>();
        string input;

        while ((input = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            collection.Add(input);

        Assert.AreEqual(6, collection.Count);
    }
}
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2  
I disagree with converting it to an array. A MemoryStream can just act as a plain ol Stream and most of the time the consumer of it doesn't care about its implementation. A lot of times you use a MemoryStream while testing and a file stream during production, for example –  Matt Greer Apr 13 '11 at 17:22
    
For my purposes, I do want to return a Stream. For the same reason Matt mentioned above. Flushing the StreamWriter was what I was missing. Thank you. –  jsmith Apr 13 '11 at 17:33
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Since you are not using "using" or streamWriter.Flush() the writer did not commit changes to the stream. As result Stream itslef does not have data yet. In general you want to wrap manipulation with Stream and StremaWriter instances with using.

You also should consider returning new instance of MemoryStream:

using(var memStream = new MemoryStream())
{
   ....
   return new MemoryStream(memStream.ToArray(), false /*writable*/);
}
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Why would you want to return a new instance of MemoryStream? Wouldn't this be inefficient, and redundant? –  jsmith Apr 13 '11 at 17:45
2  
To make it read only, to stop using extra memory allocated for writable stream, to allow normal Stream code pattern wih "using" around stream creation. In this particular case it is not very important, but often it is nice to return stream that caller can use in whatever way they want without worring if stream underneath will be closed or changed. In this particular case you can create new stream very efficiently by using GetBuffer instead of ToArray (which makes copy of internal buffer). –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 13 '11 at 18:24
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Try flushing streamWriter after writing your lines.

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