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First off, I apologize if I'm not using the right terms in my question title. It is entirely possible. I am starting to learn c++, and I will admit I'm having a really tough time with references and copies. In reference to my code below, I have the following questions:

  1. In main.c, is the argument passed to the Carrier.add() function (*it), a reference, or a copy of the plan object that I put in the vector, or something else?

  2. When this argument gets added to the Carrier's vector of Plans (inside the carrier class), is a copy added? How does that work since I didn't supply a copy constructor or tell it to make a copy? I think it is automatically generated?

  3. Please ignore this one if it is too general. I guess my main problem is that I want/need to understand how it is working, and this is where am having problems trying to find out the answers to my questions on my own. Is there a way to make visual studio generate the constructors in my actual code the same way that the compiler would, so I could step through them in debug mode to see how it all is working. Right now when I debug, it is hard for me to tell that a compiler-generated copy constructor is called (if that is what is happening at all).

Here is my code:

main.c

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include "Plan.h"
#include "Carrier.h"

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    std::vector<Plan> plans;

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
        Plan p(i);
        plans.push_back(p);
    }

    Carrier c(5);
    for(std::vector<Plan>::iterator it = plans.begin(); it != plans.end(); ++it) {
            //my question is about the line directly below this comment
        c.add(*it);
    }
    return 0;
}

Plan.h

#pragma once

class Plan
{
private:
    int id;
public:
    Plan(int id);
};

Plan.cpp

#include "Plan.h"

Plan::Plan(int i)
{
    id = i;
}

Carrier.h

#pragma once
#include <vector>
class Plan;
class Carrier
{
private:
    int id;
    std::vector<Plan> plans;
public:
    Carrier(int i);
    void add(Plan p);
};

Carrier.cpp

#include "Carrier.h"
#include "Plan.h"

Carrier::Carrier(int i) {
    id = i;
}

void Carrier::add(Plan p) {
    plans.push_back(p);
}
share|improve this question
1  
The mix of non-standard VC++ extensions and STL is weird... –  Etienne de Martel Apr 13 '11 at 17:38
1  
The terms in the question title are perfect and this is a pretty well-phrased question. +1. –  larsmans Apr 13 '11 at 17:43
    
@Etienne - Ha. yeah i'm using a book that uses stl and gcc, but i'm on windows, so i'm just using visual studio. should i not be using stl? –  oob Apr 13 '11 at 18:25
1  
Mingw is an alternative that you can give a try. There's nothing wrong in using STL. –  yasouser Apr 13 '11 at 19:04
1  
Yes, you should definitely use the STL. What you should avoid is using _tmain (prefer a plain old int main(int argc, char * argv[])). And get rid of that stdafx.h, you probably don't need it. –  Etienne de Martel Apr 13 '11 at 19:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(1) Since Carrier::add does not take its argument by reference, it is passed a copy. To have it take a reference, change its signature to

void Carrier::add(Plan const &p);

(2) When you do push_back, a copy is created regardless of whether you pass a Plan by reference or by value/copy; that's part of the semantics of std::vector (and all the other standard containers). The copy constructor is generated automatically by the compiler.

(3) I'm not a VC++ user, but the copy constructor that the compiler will generate is equivalent to

Plan::Plan(Plan const &other)
 : id(other.id)  // there's only one member,
                 // but other members would be treated the same
{}

In the empty body, you could add a printing statement indicating that the copy constructor is called, but that would not be waterproof; in some cases, C++ is allowed to perform the copy elision optimization, meaning that the actual copying is skipped.

share|improve this answer

In answer to your first question, that Plan object is passed by value, so it is a copy of the object that is passed to the function.

If you wanted a reference, you need to create the function like this:

void Carrier::add(Plan const & p)

You're passing a const object Plan here because you are not changing anything to it in the function. This is considered good practice in C++, if you are not going to make changes to an argument and are passing it by reference or pointer for that matter, make it const.

In answer to your second question, the container (std::vector) in this case is passed a copy.

share|improve this answer

In main.c, is the argument passed to the Carrier.add() function (*it), a reference, or a copy of the plan object that I put in the vector, or something else?

It is a copy because you have declared add() as void add(Plan p);. If you want to pass a reference then it should be declared as void add(Plan& p);.

When this argument gets added to the Carrier's vector of Plans (inside the carrier class), is a copy added? How does that work since I didn't supply a copy constructor or tell it to make a copy? I think it is automatically generated?

Yes. The compiler generates it for you. See here for more details.

Is there a way to make visual studio generate the constructors in my actual code the same way that the compiler would, so I could step through them in debug mode to see how it all is working.

To my knowledge you cannot specify it as a setting in Visual studio to include the code for the automatically generated copy constructor.

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1- *it is dereferencing the elements of the plans vector and passes them to c.add by value. So, that's right, a copy of each element of the plans vector is temporarily constructed in variable p (argument of add method) and then added to the plans vector of Carrier class.

2- That's right, a copy is added. The default behavior when you do not provide a copy constructor is to copy every attribute of the objects being copied. You can modify this behavior by providing a copy constructor.

3- It would not be difficult to understand how a compiler generated copy-constructor works. Just assume that every attribute of the passed object is getting copied to the object whose copy constructor is getting called.

share|improve this answer

In order to understand pass-by-value and pass-by-reference you need to know what are references. References are like aliases to same memory location.

Although the code below has nothing to do with your question, i purposely took a simple example to demonstrate whats happening.

#include<iostream>
void foo(int , int & ); //Declaration of foo

void foo(int copy, int &reference)
{
          copy++; // Updates the Local Variable Copy 
          reference++;  // Updates x
}

int main(){
    int x=10;
    int &reftox=x; // reference to x
    foo(x,reftox);
    std::cout << x;
}

Output would be 11. The remaining doubts pertaining to your question has already been answered.

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