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Below is an example of using variables in SQL Server 2000.

DECLARE @EmpIDVar INT

SET @EmpIDVar = 1234

SELECT *
FROM Employees
WHERE EmployeeID = @EmpIDVar

I want to do the exact same thing in Oracle using SQL Developer without additional complexity. It seems like a very simple thing to do, but I can't find a simple solution. How can I do it?

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As a stored procedure or as a script? If you're hardcoding the value for EmpIDVar, why use a variable at all? –  kurosch Apr 13 '11 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

In SQL*Plus, you can do something very similar

SQL> variable v_emp_id number;
SQL> select 1234 into :v_emp_id from dual;

      1234
----------
      1234

SQL> select *
  2    from emp
  3   where empno = :v_emp_id;

no rows selected

In SQL Developer, if you run a statement that has any number of bind variables (prefixed with a colon), you'll be prompted to enter values. As Alex points out, you can also do something similar using the "Run Script" function (F5) with the alternate EXEC syntax Alex suggests does.

variable v_count number;
variable v_emp_id number;
exec :v_emp_id := 1234;
exec select count(1) into :v_count from emp;
select *
  from emp
 where empno = :v_emp_id
exec print :v_count;
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11  
if you 'run script' (F5) instead of 'run statement' then it won't prompt for the bind variables. But it doesn't seem to like the select...into (ORA-01006), so you'd need to do exec :v_emp_id := 1234; instead. –  Alex Poole Apr 13 '11 at 18:37
    
@Alex - Nice! I just gave up and assumed that SQL Developer was always prompting for bind variable values. I incorporated your suggestions into my answer. –  Justin Cave Apr 13 '11 at 19:00
1  
@Nathan if you're looking to execute an package with :v_emp_id, you can use bind variables for the refcursors as well. See the bottom of Alex's answer to a similar question I had –  Conrad Frix Apr 13 '11 at 19:11
1  
@AlexPoole is there a way to send the output to the Query Result window? In my job I run queries to export to Excel files. –  tp9 Jun 9 '12 at 1:18

I am using the SQL-Developer in Version 3.2. The other stuff didn't work for me, but this did:

define value1 = 'sysdate'

SELECT &&value1 from dual;

Also it's the slickest way presented here, yet.

(If you omit the "define"-part you'll be prompted for that value)

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5  
also works with only one & –  Michael R Apr 9 '13 at 15:01
2  
If comparing &&value1 to a string value like: &&value1 = 'Some string' then &&value1 needs to be wrapped in single quotes like: '&&value1' = 'Some string' –  Ryan E Mar 5 at 21:29
    
In SQL Developer, substitution variables defined by DEFINE seem to be persistent between query executions. If I change the variable value, but do not explicitly highlight the DEFINE line when executing, the previous value remains. (Is this because of the double && ?) –  Baodad May 13 at 23:00
    
This page in section 2.4 talks about the difference between the single ampersand (&) and double ampersand (&&) –  Baodad May 13 at 23:03
    
For those of us used to working with queries with variables in Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio, this is the best answer. We may need to get used to highlighting the whole query before executing, though. –  Baodad May 13 at 23:07

There are two types of variable in SQL-plus: substitution and bind.

This is substitution (substitution variables can replace SQL*Plus command options or other hard-coded text):

define a = 1;
select &a from dual;
undefine a;

This is bind (bind variables store data values for SQL and PL/SQL statements executed in the RDBMS; they can hold single values or complete result sets):

var x number;
exec :x := 10;
select :x from dual;
exec select count(*) into :x from dual;
exec print x;

SQL Developer supports substitution variables, but when you execute a query with bind :var syntax you are prompted for the binding (in a dialog box).

Reference:

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Simple answer NO.

However you can achieve something similar by running the following version using bind variables:

SELECT * FROM Employees WHERE EmployeeID = :EmpIDVar 

Once you run the query above in SQL Developer you will be prompted to enter value for the bind variable EmployeeID.

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