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I have the following method

+ (NSString*)getMeMyString
{
   NSString *result;
   dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        result = [ClassNotThreadSafe getString];
    });
   return result;
}

How can i make the block to do it's job synchronously, so that it doesn't return the result before it was retreived?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are calling dispatch_async which dispatches your block asynchronously. Try using dispatch_sync or dispatch_main if your goal is to block the main thread.

+ (NSString*)getMeMyString
{
   __block NSString *result;
   dispatch_sync(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        result = [ClassNotThreadSafe getString];
    });
   return result;
}

Grand Central Dispatch Reference

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He's using GCD to run it on the main thread. –  BJ Homer Apr 13 '11 at 18:38
    
Yes he is! I will make my answer more relevant for his goal. –  Joe Apr 13 '11 at 18:44
    
NOTE: [ClassNotThreadSafe getString] this method is not thread safe that's why I am trying to use a block. –  aryaxt Apr 13 '11 at 18:46
    
@Joe: it should be __block NSString *result;, otherwise result is a const entity within the block and can't be modified. –  BJ Homer Apr 13 '11 at 18:49
    
I see, is your goal to always run this code on the main thread or just have it synchronized across all threads that access it. I ask because you may be able able to accomplish what you are doing with a static object and @synchronized block. –  Joe Apr 13 '11 at 18:50

Use dispatch_sync instead of dispatch_async - then the current thread will be blocked until the block has finished executing on the main thread.

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2  
This. Also, you'll want to declare your result string as __block so your object reference is passed back out. –  Wevah Apr 13 '11 at 18:47
    
@Wevah: thanks, missed that. –  CRD Apr 13 '11 at 18:55

Since it seems like you want to perform a method on a different thread and get a return value, why don't you use an NSInvocation?

SEL theSelector;
NSMethodSignature *aSignature;
NSInvocation *anInvocation;

theSelector = @selector(getString);
aSignature = [ClassNotThreadSafe instanceMethodSignatureForSelector:theSelector];
anInvocation = [NSInvocation invocationWithMethodSignature:aSignature];
[anInvocation setSelector:theSelector];

NSString *result;

[anInvocation performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(invoke) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
[anInvocation getReturnValue:result];
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This is really interesting and useful, but seems to be too much work for this situation :) –  aryaxt Apr 13 '11 at 20:55

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