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Firefox has a SpiderMonkey javascript engine. Chrome has V8 javascript engine.

Obviously those engines are a separate products and browsers utilize some kind of interface API to interact with them.

On the other hand programmers longed for a long time for their favorite language in browser. So much so, that we have products like GWT (for java), parenscript (for common lisp), HJScript (for haskell), and i'm sure many other libraries for many other languages that allow programmers stay with their favorite language and generate client side code as well.

The idea is so obvious that i am surprised that there's no implementation of it yet. Why not publish the interface API of browser to language engine and allow web sites to provide custom language engines as downloadable bundles. With current internet speeds 3-4 megabytes one time download is not a problem for majority of applications, even more so for intranet usage.

So where's our pluggable engines ?

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What about security? –  pmdj Apr 13 '11 at 19:00
    
SpiderMonkey and V8 and not just languages, they are also a complete VM. Why not separate language from a VM, and allow third parties provide their own languages like JVM and dotnet do ? That would take care of security too. –  Vagif Verdi Apr 13 '11 at 19:08
    
I fail to see the benefit... why would you want this? –  Juan Mendes Jun 6 '12 at 14:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You don't need pluggable engines really, just an agreed upon byte-code format. Google is going down that path now with NaCl and PNaCl which is based on LLVM. So any program that compiled down to a safe subset of LLVM byte-code could be run in the browser.

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We've been down this route in the past.

Older versions of IE supported VBScript as a scripting language in addition to JScript.

The result was a whole load of sites that only worked in IE.

This isn't what the web needs again. As a developer, I may desperately want to write code using my favourite language, but as a user I want to be able to browse all sites on the web without having to worry about which plug-ins I need for any given site, or whether my preferred browser can even use those plug-ins.

This is the problem that Microsoft's Silverlight has had. It might be a marvellous technology, but to the end user, why do I want another plug-in? Silverlight has managed to gain some market share thanks to the sheer power of Microsoft, but really not that much.

Now, if the code reaching the end user is consistent, regardless of the language it's written in, then the language doesn't matter. But this effectively means compiled code (or at least bytecode), which is a whole different kettle of fish to running a scripting language in the browser.

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I guess you forgot about applets and embed's. Both offer exactly what you want. And both suck for the very same reason.

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Browser vendors can't even agree on a common video format (see the html5 <video> debate) or on how the document DOM object should look like, and you want them to agree on a whole language interface?

Good luck.

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Success is never blamed. Macromedia did not wait for everyone to agree on a standard. They just rolled out their own solution. And now flash is de facto internet standard. SpiderMonkey and V8 and not just languages, they are also a complete VM. Why not separate language from a VM, and allow third parties provide their own languages like JVM and dotnet do ? That would take care of security too. –  Vagif Verdi Apr 13 '11 at 19:28
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But my point stands that they would need to agree on a common interface, and that's insanely unlikely. Plus you have short-sighted teams like Internet Explorer's (sorry but that's just truth, you can't get more stubbornly set in inferiority than those guys) who, even if they'd agree to something complex enough to allow optimizations, would never implement them, so you'd be back to square one. –  Blindy Apr 13 '11 at 19:35

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