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From what I've been reading, Sass is a language that makes CSS more powerful with variable and math support.

What's the difference with SCSS? Is it supposed to be the same language? Similar? Different?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 461 down vote accepted

Sass is a CSS pre-processor with syntax advancements. Style sheets in the advanced syntax are processed by the program, and turned into regular CSS style sheets. However, they do not extend the CSS standard itself.

The main reason for this is the addition of features that CSS painfully lacks (like variables).

Re the difference between SCSS and Sass, the text on the Sass home page should answer the question:

Sass is an extension of CSS3, adding nested rules, variables, mixins, selector inheritance, and more. It’s translated to well-formatted, standard CSS using the command line tool or a web-framework plugin.

Sass has two syntaxes. The new main syntax (as of Sass 3) is known as “SCSS” (for “Sassy CSS”), and is a superset of CSS3’s syntax. This means that every valid CSS3 stylesheet is valid SCSS as well. SCSS files use the extension .scss.

The second, older syntax is known as the indented syntax (or just “Sass”). Inspired by Haml’s terseness, it’s intended for people who prefer conciseness over similarity to CSS. Instead of brackets and semicolons, it uses the indentation of lines to specify blocks. Although no longer the primary syntax, the indented syntax will continue to be supported. Files in the indented syntax use the extension .sass.

However, all this works only with the Sass pre-compiler which in the end creates CSS. It is not an extension to the CSS standard itself.

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11  
I missed the sintax differences in the home page. Thank you for this and for the quick explanation. –  bruno077 Apr 13 '11 at 19:37
    
English is not my first language and i did'nt understand on thing.. .scss or .sass will not be suported in the future? –  Daniel Faria Mar 19 '14 at 20:44
4  
The above text was removed from Sass homepage now. Thanks a lot for the answer with the quoted text! –  Roy Ling Mar 29 '14 at 12:39
2  
The text is now moved here: sass-lang.com/documentation/file.SASS_REFERENCE.html#syntax –  Roy Ling Mar 29 '14 at 13:36
4  
After reading this answer out loud, I know realize I have a lisp. –  robnardo Apr 23 at 16:45

I'm one of the developers who helped create Sass.

The difference is UI. Underneath the textual exterior they are identical. This is why sass and scss files can import each other. Actually, Sass has four syntax parsers: scss, sass, CSS, and less. All of these convert a different syntax into an Abstract Syntax Tree which is further processed into CSS output or even onto one of the other formats via the sass-convert tool.

Use the syntax you like the best, both are fully supported and you can change between them later if you change your mind.

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21  
Thank you for the honest explanation! you've done an amazing job guys with this language! –  bruno077 Apr 20 '11 at 23:55
15  
One can use LESS for SASS? 8| Explanation needed. Urgent. Medics! –  kaiser Jan 29 '13 at 15:08
12  
Excuse me? Did I read that right? Can Sass actually import Less files correctly? Is there any synergy between mixins/variables? –  pilau Jun 1 '13 at 13:30
1  
I hope SASS will continue to be supported, as that is the method I prefer! –  Design by Adrian Jun 19 '13 at 18:22
2  
Similarity to standard CSS may be more important in group environments where there are people who need to read your code, but only occasionally, and they don't have time/interest to learn a whole new syntax. –  c roald Aug 16 '14 at 21:25

From the homepage of the language

Sass has two syntaxes. The new main syntax (as of Sass 3) is known as “SCSS” (for “Sassy CSS”), and is a superset of CSS3’s syntax. This means that every valid CSS3 stylesheet is valid SCSS as well. SCSS files use the extension .scss.

The second, older syntax is known as the indented syntax (or just “Sass”). Inspired by Haml’s terseness, it’s intended for people who prefer conciseness over similarity to CSS. Instead of brackets and semicolons, it uses the indentation of lines to specify blocks. Although no longer the primary syntax, the indented syntax will continue to be supported. Files in the indented syntax use the extension .sass.

SASS is an interpreted language that spits out CSS. The structure of Sass looks like CSS (remotely), but it seems to me that the description is a bit misleading; it's not a replacement for CSS, or an extension. It's an interpreter which spits out CSS in the end, so Sass still has the limitations of normal CSS, but it masks them with simple code.

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missed that, thank you very much –  bruno077 Apr 13 '11 at 19:35

The Sass .sass file is cleaner than .scss file e.g.

example.sass

$color: red

@mixin my-border($color)
  border: 1px solid $color

body
  background: $color
  +my-border(green)

example.scss

$color: red;

@mixin my-border($color) {
  border: 1px solid $color;
}

body {
  background: $color;
  @include my-border(green);
}

Any valid CSS document can be converted to Sass simply by changing the extension from .css to .scss.

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7  
Surprised this is the only answer with a code example. Although I wouldn't say sass is cleaner than scss. I personally find the use of brackets and semicolons cleaner, because it's much easier to read quickly. –  Novocaine Mar 5 at 14:03
    
best answer here –  fractalspawn May 13 at 22:08

The basic difference is the syntax. While SASS has a loose syntax with white space and no semicolons, the SCSS resembles more to CSS.

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Its syntax is different, and that's main pro (or con, depending on your perspective).

I'll try not to repeat much what others said, you can easily google that but instead I'll like to say a couple of things from my experience using both, sometimes even in same project.

SASS pro

  • cleaner - if you are coming from Python, Ruby (you can even write props with symbol-like syntax) or even CoffeeScript world, it will come very natural to you - writing mixins, functions and generealy any reusable stuff in .sass is much 'easier' and readable than in .scss (subjective).

SASS cons

  • white space sensitive (subjective), I don't mind it in other languages but here in CSS it just bothers me (issues: copying, tab vs space war, etc).
  • no inline rules (this was game breaking for me), you can't do body color: red like you can in .scss body {color: red}
  • importing other vendor stuff, copying vanilla css snippets - not impossible but very boring after some time. Solution is to either have .scss files (alongside with .sass files) in you project or to convert them to .sass.

Other than this - they do the same job.

Now, what I like to do is to write mixins and variables in .sass and code that will actually compile to css in .scss if possible (ie Visual studio doesn't have support for .sass but whenever I work on Rails projects I usually combine two of them, not in one file ofc).

Lately I'm considering giving Stylus a chance (for a fulltime css preprocessor) because it allows you to combine two syntax in one file (among some other features). That may not be good direction for a team to take but when you are maintaining it alone - it's ok. Stylus is actually most flexible when syntax is in question.

And finaly mixin for .scss vs .sass syntax comparison:

// SCSS
@mixin cover {
  $color: red;
  @for $i from 1 through 5 {
    &.bg-cover#{$i} { background-color: adjust-hue($color, 15deg * $i) }
  }
}
.wrapper { @include cover }


// SASS
=cover
  $color: red
  @for $i from 1 through 5
    &.bg-cover#{$i}
      background-color: adjust-hue($color, 15deg * $i)
.wrapper
  +cover
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How does this add anything over the existing answers? –  cimmanon May 13 at 14:23
    
Are you blind or just angry? Pls don't downvote just for the sake of punishing, its stupid. Nobody mention some of the stuff that I said. I didn't said that its not common knowledge, but c'mon, take it easy and give a look at some of the older answers... –  Drops May 13 at 14:28
    
@cimmanon It features pros and cons, spelled out clearly. That is the difference between this and other answers. I upvoted to pull out of the red. I thought it was useful even though it has the usual venn diagram of answer overlap that every other SO post has. This could be more useful to someone just making the choice on the two paths. I also think it's a bit better than the accepted answer because it actually shows the difference of the language instead of just saying "Sass is different because it's not SCSS", which to me is useless. I could do without the personal usage stuff, but still :) –  fractalspawn May 13 at 22:01

Sass was the first one, and The syntax is a bit diffrent. For example, including a mixin:

Sass: +mixinname()
Scss: @include mixinname()

Sass ignores curly brackets and semi colons and lay on nesting, which I found more useful.

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