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Is there really no way to animate a gradient-background with CSS?

something like:

@-webkit-keyframes pulse {
  0% {
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0, rgb(196,222,242)), color-stop(0.5, rgb(242,242,242)), color-stop(1, rgb(240,240,240)));
  }
  50% {
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0, rgb(222,252,255)), color-stop(0.5, rgb(242,242,242)), color-stop(1, rgb(240,240,240)));
  }
  100% {
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0, rgb(196,222,242)), color-stop(0.5, rgb(242,242,242)), color-stop(1, rgb(240,240,240)));
  }
}

I know, for Safari 5.1+ and Chrome 10+ there is a new gradient-syntax, but for now, I have to stick with the old one for this project.

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you can't change css or what? –  atlavis Apr 13 '11 at 19:38
    
? … nothing happens if I run this animation on a element ( -webkit-animation: pulse 1s infinite; ) –  albuvee Apr 13 '11 at 19:55
    
I think it does not work with gradients, even with new syntax –  atlavis Apr 13 '11 at 20:40
    
I just learnt this the hard way! transitions on a linear gradient do not work yet –  iancrowther May 23 '11 at 13:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Transitions are not supported yet on webkit gradients. It's in the spec, but it doesn't work yet.

(p.s. if you're doing color transitions only - you may want to check out -webkit-filters - which do animate!)

Update: gradient transitions apparently do work in IE10+

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2  
It's in the spec for the new syntax though, not proprietary -webkit-gradient() crap. –  Lea Verou Apr 14 '11 at 9:19
1  
AFAIK there's no support for gradient transitions anywhere yet - even the ones that support the new syntax. –  Michael Mullany Apr 14 '11 at 18:48
1  
BTW, if you're willing to go SVG - then gradient transitions are just dandy - as long as you're on a recent browser. See srufaculty.sru.edu/david.dailey/svg/Stwelve.svg –  Michael Mullany Nov 21 '11 at 18:22

Put each gradient variation on it's own layer. Absolute position them. Give each it's own set of keyframes synchronized with each other. In those keyframes define opacity for each layer, at each keyframe, with 1 and 0 mixed around amongst keyframes.

Beware that the container's color will bleed through, so wrap the layers in a parent with a background of white.

http://jsfiddle.net/jSsZn/

share|improve this answer
    
That's indeed really clever — but you need additional elements only for styling (for me a no-go) and in most cases this is not possible because you relay on the gradient as a background of a element by its own. but thanks for this creative solution — right now this seems to be one of the only ways to animate — at least 'fake'-animate — a gradient. –  albuvee Apr 10 '12 at 13:33
    
Really clever solution here. –  dmackerman Mar 21 '13 at 14:35

I solved the problem via applicating :before attribution to the a tag.

Link: http://codepen.io/azizarslan/pen/xsoje

CSS:

nav ul#menu li a {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 1;

    /* webkit gradient background */
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, rgb(204, 0, 51), rgb(153, 0, 0));
}

nav ul#menu li a:before {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: block; 
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    z-index: -1;
    opacity: 0;

    /* webkit gradient background */
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, rgb(0, 156, 204), rgb(0, 111, 145));

    /* webkit transition */
    -webkit-transition: all 250ms linear;

    /* before hack */
    content: ".";
    text-indent: -99999px;
}

nav ul#menu li a:hover:before {
    opacity: 1;
}
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Great work around. I got it to work in IE 10 & 11 too. It's good enough fallback (no smooth transition but hover works all the same) on IE 9 but earlier versions may require a compatibility fallback if IE 8 or earlier statement. –  Nick Mc Dec 30 '13 at 8:07

You should check out css sandpaper- this lets you achieve animated gradients, but it's not a pure css solution. Css sandpaper takes care of cross-browser rendering of the gradient, and there's a piece of javascript which handles the animation.

http://www.useragentman.com/blog/2010/04/05/cross-browser-animated-css-transforms-even-in-ie/

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@Brian instead of using new html elements, use sudo elements :before and :after. Position the main element as relative, then position the pseudo elements as absolute with 0 for top, left, right, and bottom.

HTML:

<div></div>

CSS:

div {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    position: relative;
}

div::before, div::after {
    display: block;
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0;
}

Add your keyframes and gradients to the div and the pseudo elements using opacity. Use z-index to control which is on-top of which.

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if you are looking for a transition of your text from a solid color to a gradient. Just animate the rgba color of the text to reveal the background gradient applied on it.

CSS:

.button {
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right bottom, color-stop(0%,#fe046e), color-stop(100%,#a02ed4));
    -webkit-background-clip: text;
    color: rgba(255,255,255,1);

    -webkit-transition: all .2s ease-in-out;
            transition: all .2s ease-in-out;
}

.button:hover {
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right bottom, color-stop(0%,#fe046e), color-stop(100%,#a02ed4));
    -webkit-background-clip: text;
    color: rgba(255,255,255,0);
}
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