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I have a fairly mundane piece jQuery that toggles a div's visibility when a + is clicked and hides it when a - is clicked (the + changes to a - when clicked). The problem is that the +/- toggler follows some text that sometimes has a + or - in it and both toggle. For instance: Find out more about blah-blah +. When clicked, the plus changes to a minus. When clicked again, both minuses change to pluses.

I thought if i just changed the + to a + and a minus to a — in the jquery it would solve the problem, but it doesn't work. The div visibility toggles on/off but the plus/minus symbols don't change.

Here is the script:

function toggleSpecial(element)
{
    jQuery(element).next(".hidden").slideToggle("fast"); 
    jQuery(element).html(function(i,html) {
        if (html.indexOf('+') != -1 ){
           html = html.replace('+','-');
        } else {
           html = html.replace('-','+');
        }
        return html;
    });
}

Here is the script with HTML codes replacing the + and - which doesn't work.

function toggleSpecial(element)
{
    jQuery(element).next(".hidden").slideToggle("fast"); 
    jQuery(element).html(function(i,html) {
        if (html.indexOf('+') != -1 ){
           html = html.replace('+','—');
        } else {
           html = html.replace('—','+');
        }
        return html;
    });
}

Any ideas about what I am doing wrong or suggestions? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
why dont you enclose the + in a div and only toggle within that div? –  Yasser Apr 13 '11 at 20:03
    
He/she is likely clicking on an a, and we all know that as are inline elements while divs are block elements. <span> is what he/she wants, assuming he/she wants to pass validation! –  Adam Terlson Apr 13 '11 at 20:08
    
If the answer I gave below was the one you were looking for, please mark it as the answer. –  Adam Terlson Apr 14 '11 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're basing your visibility toggling off of something totally arbitrary. Why not just see if it's visible or not? Additionally, you can just wrap the character in a span and then do something like this:

$('#iamelement').click(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.next(".hidden").slideToggle("fast", function() {
        $this.find('span').text($(this).is(':visible') ? '-' : '+');
    }); 
});

This would be for something like this:

<a href="#" id="iamelement">toggle thing <span>+</span></a>
<div class="hidden">
    thing
</div>

The proof is in the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/rFeeJ/1/

ADDITIONS: To make it generic, you need to use classes instead of IDs. I was merely trying to be illustrative.

<a href="#" class="toggler">toggle thing <span>+</span></a>
<div class="hidden">
    thing
</div>
<a href="#" class="toggler">toggle thing 2 <span>+</span></a>
<div class="hidden">
    thing 2 
</div>
<a href="#" class="toggler">toggle thing 3 <span>+</span></a>
<div class="hidden">
    thing 3
</div>

$('a.toggler').click(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.next(".hidden").slideToggle("fast", function() {
        $this.find('span').text($(this).is(':visible') ? '-' : '+');
    }); 
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply Adam... what if I don't have the ability to add unique ID's for each instance? Also, the second toggle in your example does work. Thanks! –  Peachy Apr 13 '11 at 22:08
    
That's because I had two IDs in my HTML but only referenced one. See update above for more info on making it generic without IDs. –  Adam Terlson Apr 13 '11 at 22:22
    
If this answer was the one you were looking for, please mark it as the answer. –  Adam Terlson Apr 14 '11 at 3:34
    
Thank you, that will do the trick! –  Peachy Apr 15 '11 at 15:29

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