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I have a 3rd-party Java library I'm trying to encapsulate in a separate JVM with RMI (because the library has native calls that crash the JVM, and there are applications for running the RMI server on another machine).

My Java app on the client side works like this, at least when everything runs on the same machine:

  1. find the object bound to FooBar/<id> in the RMI registry
  2. if it's already bound to the registry, use it and goto step 5.
  3. otherwise, start up a separate JVM to create the object in question.
  4. wait for a short timeout
  5. find the object bound to FooBar/<id> in the RMI registry
  6. if we have an object, success! (otherwise failure)

The problem I have, is when the other JVM crashes, it seems to leave the binding present in the RMI registry, and then I end up using a phantom object connected to nothing.

Is there a way I can somehow check the proxy object bound to the RMI registry in step 2, so if the object is invalid, I can create a new one to rebind() to the RMI registry?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

set a timeout on your rmi requests (see here). then if a request times out, consider the object dead. additionally, when i want very reliable rmi code, i will wrap the rmi calls on the client side with some sort of retry/backoff functionality (assuming your outgoing calls are idempotent). thus, you would try connecting a few times with delays in between before considering the target object dead.

(and no, there is no way to determine if the remote object is dead without trying to contact it).

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"there is no way to determine if the remote object is dead without trying to contact it" -- meaning call one of its methods? So in other words it's good to have at least one benign method to call. –  Jason S Apr 13 '11 at 20:37
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that doesn't really solve the problem. the problem with having a "benign" method, is that you could make such a call, get a response, (then the server crashes) then try to make a real call and get a timeout. best solution is to make all your calls retryable and just make normal calls. (even if a normal call fails, it could have "succeeded" on the server but failed when trying to return the response: ultimately, you never know). –  jtahlborn Apr 13 '11 at 20:51
    
You could implement a simple 'Ping' method but this requires active polling, which may introduce unnecessary overhead if you make RMI calls infrequently. Even with a 'Ping' call, there is no guarantee your object is still valid after you call Ping so it's no silver bullet to the problem. You're better off managing your RMI calls in such a way that they can be re-called if there is an error. –  Aaron Saarela Apr 13 '11 at 20:56
    
"...you could make such a call, get a response, (then the server crashes)" -- true, but unlikely in my case. I already do the right thing if it crashes after my initial handshaking setup, I just needed a way to test during setup. –  Jason S Apr 13 '11 at 21:06
    
For the other readers out there, another corner case would be when your client makes a single remote call and passes in a callback handler. In this case, your client indefinitely ends waiting for data push from the server which never happens if your RMI service crashes. Make sure you implement some sort of polling to get around this issue or at least keep this in mind when writing callback driven RMI clients. –  Sanjay T. Sharma May 5 '11 at 13:51

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