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I'm trying to take a table of motorsport lap positions and plot a lap chart similar to this http://www.fia.com/en-GB/sport/championships/f1/2010/bahrain/Pages/lap_chart.aspx.

Each row corresponds to a lap, with the first lap in the first row. The car numbers are listed across each row in the order they pass the start/finish line The table may look like this (4-car race, 6 laps:

1 3 2 4
1 3 2 4
1 3 4 2
3 1 4 2
3 1 4 2
3 4 1 2

In the above example, the order was 1,3,2,4 after the first lap, and by the end of the 6-lap race, car 3 won, car 4 was in second, and so on.

It's easy to plot this incorrectly, I did this:

ListLinePlot[Table[Position[data,x],{x,4}]]

Mathematica graphics

This does produce a lap chart, but it has 1st position at the bottom and 4th position at the top, and what I really need is the y-axis to run 4-3-2-1 so 1st position is at the top.

How can I reverse the y-axis so it runs from 1(top) to n(bottom)?

share|improve this question
1  
BarChart and Histogram as of v8 have a new option, ScalingFunctions, which can take the value "Reverse". It's a pity it doesn't work for normal Plots. – Sjoerd C. de Vries Apr 13 '11 at 21:43
    
Ron, when a car drops out of the race, how is that represented? By the way, welcome to StackOverflow. – Mr.Wizard Apr 14 '11 at 0:03
    
Ron, Welcome to Stack Overflow. Nice question, including the part about drivers not finishing. – DavidC Apr 14 '11 at 10:08
    
Ron, please be sure to vote on and accept answers. See: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5235 and the main FAQ which that is from: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/7931 – Mr.Wizard Apr 15 '11 at 9:52

Just use Quadrant 4 to settle the position-on-screen problem.

This also works for DNF! (Drivers that did not finish).

First place is plotted at y = -1, second place is plotted at y = -2, etc. Note how y is replaced by -y in {{lap_, y_} :> {lap - 1, -y}} below.

lap was decremented by 1 because I included data for the starting position (lap=zero).


A minor rewrite, to work with different numbers of drivers and laps, and reformat the code for increased legibility. - Mr.Wizard


data = 
  {{1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 4, 1, 2}};

{p, n} = {Max@data, Length@data};

ticks = {#, #} &@Array[{-#, #} &, p];
ticks[[All, 1, 2]] = {"Pole", "Winner"};

PrependTo[data, Range@p];  (* add starting position *)

ListLinePlot[
 Replace[
   Array[data~Position~# &, p],
   {lap_, y_} :> {lap - 1, -y},
   {2}
 ],
 Frame -> True,
 FrameLabel ->
  {"Laps Completed",
   "Starting Positions",
   "Laps Completed",
   "Final Positions"},
 GridLines -> {Range[0, n + 1], None},
 FrameTicks -> {ticks, {All, All}},
 PlotRange -> {Automatic, {-.7, -.3 - p}},
 PlotStyle -> Thickness[.01]
]

race cars

Here's the case where car #1 (the one that started in the Pole Position) dropped out before completing the final two laps. Notice that car #3 automatically advanced by one position.

DNF

share|improve this answer
    
Very pretty. Please explain the position logic. – Mr.Wizard Apr 13 '11 at 22:57
    
Thanks everyone, these are some really good ideas. I played with some solutions and the ones I tried work fine... as long as all the cars that started the race finish the race. Now I'm playing with how to resolve the issue where you have DNFs, because that messes up the simple "reversal" that I've seen. – Ron Apr 13 '11 at 22:58
1  
@Mr.Wizard There was an error in an earlier version. I removed the replacement rules and used a more straightforward way to represent positions on screen,using Quadrant 4. – DavidC Apr 14 '11 at 0:15
1  
David, your answer is much nicer than mine. If I may have permission to make a few tweaks to yours, I will delete mine. – Mr.Wizard Apr 14 '11 at 0:37
1  
David, I made another change, because I realized the replacement rule broke the plot when there were only two drivers. By limiting the replacement to "level 2" it is made safe. – Mr.Wizard Apr 15 '11 at 10:01

Reverse the order of the positions, and then relabel the ticks:

ListLinePlot[
 Table[Position[data, x] /. {xx_, yy_} :> {xx, 5 - yy}, {x, 4}],
 Ticks -> {Automatic, {{1, 4}, {2, 3}, {3, 2}, {4, 1}}}, 
 PlotStyle -> Thickness[.01]]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Michael, congratulation on 4,000 rep! – Mr.Wizard Apr 13 '11 at 22:13
    
Thanks! I'm glad to see the Mathematica community growing! – Michael Pilat Apr 14 '11 at 1:40

Ok, someone brought up BarChart and ScalingFunctions, so here we go....

BarChart[Ordering /@ data, ChartLayout -> "Overlapped", 
 Joined -> Automatic, BarSpacing -> 0, ChartElementFunction -> ({} &),
  ChartStyle -> 1, ScalingFunctions -> "Reverse", Axes -> False, 
 Frame -> {{True, False}, {True, False}}, PlotRange -> {All, All}, 
 BaseStyle -> Thickness[0.01]]

BarChart-based solution

(but the ListPlot solution is probably easier. Too bad it doesn't support ScalingFunctions yet.)

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this one's great because it can handle the case where cars don't finish. It worked right out of the box for me, thanks! – Ron Apr 13 '11 at 23:01

I am going to leave up this "clever" implementation because I like it, but David's answer is far more robust.

laps = 
  {{1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 4, 1, 2}};

ListLinePlot[
  -Thread[Ordering /@ laps],
  AxesOrigin -> {1, 0}, PlotStyle -> Thick,
  Ticks -> {All, Array[{-#, #} &, 4]}
]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

How about now showing the y-axes at all:

data = {{1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 2, 4},
   {1, 3, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 1, 4, 2},
   {3, 4, 1, 2}};

ListLinePlot[Table[Position[5 - data, x], {x, 4}], 
 Axes -> {True, False}]

Mathematica graphics

share|improve this answer

ScalingFunctions now appears to work with ListLinePlot

data = {{1, 3, 2, 4}, {1, 3, 2, 4}, {1, 3, 4, 2}, {3, 1, 4, 2}, {3, 1,
     4, 2}, {3, 4, 1, 2}};
ListLinePlot[Table[Position[data, x], {x, 4}], 
 ScalingFunctions -> {Identity, "Reverse"}, AxesOrigin -> {1, -5}]

I have no idea why the AxesOrigin y-coordinate needs to be negative.

Mathematica graphics

share|improve this answer

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