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I have a base class and a few derived classes. The base class contains a property that needs to be injected. How do I configure Unity to build my objects?

public class BaseService<T> where T : class
{
    public T Entity { get; private set; }

    [Dependency]
    public IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork { get; private set; }

    public BaseService(T obj)
    {
        this.Entity = obj;
    }
}

public class ContactService : BaseService<Contact>
{
    public ContactService(Contact obj) : base(obj)
    {
    }

    public bool IsValid()
    {
        bool result = false;

        // ...

        return result;
    }

    public void AddContact()
    {
        if (!IsValid()) { throw new InvalidEntityException<Contact>(); }

        try
        {
            this.UnitOfWork.BeginTransaction();

            this.UnitOfWork.Add<Contact>(this.Entity);

            this.UnitOfWork.CommitTransaction();
        }
        catch
        {
            this.UnitOfWork.RollbackTransaction();
        }  
    }
}

How do I register this first of all and then how do I resolve ContactService since it has a constructor with arguments that can't be injected? Should I even be using Unity for this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I try to avoid that situation by structuring things like this:

public class ContactService : IContactService
{
    private readonly IContactRepository repository;
    private readonly IValidator<Contact> validator;
    private readonly IUnitOfWork unitOfWork;

    public ContactService(
        IContactRepository repository,
        IValidator<Contact> validator,
        IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
        this.validator = validator;
        this.unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
    }

    public void Add(Contact contact)
    {
        if (!validator.IsValid(contact)) throw new ArgumentException();

        try
        {
            unitOfWork.Start();
            repository.Save(contact);
            unitOfWork.Commit();
        }
        catch
        {
            unitOfWork.Rollback();
            throw;
        }
    }
}

With this basic pattern in place, Unity can build up your service with all its dependencies and you don't get into the issue injecting the contact. The repository can be used as an abstraction or just directly use your favorite data access framework like EF, NHibernate, or plain old Ado.Net if that's how you roll.

Since the try catch stuff is repetative, you can use an extension method to compact your code like this:

public void Add(Contact contact)
{
    if (!validator.IsValid(contact)) throw new ArgumentException();

    unitOfWork.Execute(() => repository.Save(contact));
}

The extension method looks like this:

public static class UnitOfWorkExtensions
{ 
    public static void Execute(this IUnitOfWork unitOfWork, Action action)
    {
        try
        {
            unitOfWork.Start();
            action.Invoke();
            unitOfWork.Commit();
        }
        catch
        {
            unitOfWork.Rollback();
            throw;
        }
    }
}

More on this: http://www.agileatwork.com/refactoring-c-style/

The big advantage of structuring your code this way is that you can take advantage of Unity's interception mechanism and do lots of cool things like move the unit of work code to an aspect (attribute):

[UnitOfWork]
public void Add(Contact contact)
{
    if (!validator.IsValid(contact)) throw new ArgumentException();

    repository.Save(contact);
}

You can use a similar technique to add additional behaviors like logging, exception handling, and security.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, reconfiguring the constructor to not require the contact is better since in my case the service is nothing more than a wrapper for workflows so no need to take in the contact in constructor since i'm not maintaining any state. Thanks! –  DustinDavis Apr 14 '11 at 1:48

You can use UnitiContainer.BuildUp for injecting dependencies on an existing object. If you have a small predefined set of values for you constructor parameter you can use InjectionConstructor class to specify the value of the parameter during registration. Otherwise register a factory class with Unity and use it to create your services.

public class ContactServiceFactory
{    
    IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork { get; private set; }

    public ContractServiceFactory(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    { 
        UnitOfWork = unitOfWork;
    }

    public ContactService Create(Contact obj) 
    {
        return new ContractService(obj, unitOfWork);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I thought about a factory. I'm going to look into BuildUp and registering a factory but i'm going for more abstraction so hopefully I can get it while still using those methods. –  DustinDavis Apr 14 '11 at 1:50
    
Actually after thinking about it, a factory is probably better to control abstraction and really keep the domain IoC ignorant. –  DustinDavis Apr 14 '11 at 14:39

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