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I'm using the DriveInfo class in my C# project to retrieve the available bytes on given drives. How to I correctly convert this number into Mega- or Gigabytes? Dividing by 1024 will not do the job I guess. The results always differ from those shown in the Windows-Explorer.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

1024 is correct for usage in programs.

The reason you may be having differences is likely due to differences in what driveinfo reports as "available space" and what windows considers available space.

Note that only drive manufacturers use 1,000. Within windows and most programs the correct scaling is 1024.

Also, while your compiler should optimize this anyway, this calculation can be done by merely shifting the bits by 10 for each magnitude:

KB = B >> 10
MB = KB >> 10 = B >> 20
GB = MB >> 10 = KB >> 20 = B >> 30

Although for readability I expect successive division by 1024 is clearer.

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Yes, only drive manufacturers use the 1,000-based definitions. That's why your "4.7 GB" drives are actually 4,700,372,992 bytes, "50 GB" Blu-Ray is only 50,050,629,632 bytes, your "128 kbps" mp3 is actually 128,000 bits per second, a "3.1 megapixel" camera only has 3,145,728 pixels, a 2 GHz processor is actually 2,000,000,000 hertz, a 16 GB/s memory bus is actually 16,000,000 bytes per second, ... –  endolith Aug 12 '09 at 20:17
    
As we're talking about drives, the statement stands. I could be more explicit and state that the manufacturers of the hardware represent the size in billions while the software designers represent the size in gibibytes, but it's explicit enough. You are correct in stating that many other things have similar issues, but this discussion is about file and drive sizes, not processor speeds, image sensor sizes, etc. Sorry if I have confused you, hope this clears things up. –  Adam Davis Aug 13 '09 at 19:07
2  
1024 is only "correct" in that it represents the actual number of bits on the disk. If you're concerned about correctness however, you need to display that with the unit "GiB". Using 1024 and calling it a "GB" is technically incorrect. GB is officially 1000 million, not 1024 million. I'd argue that 1000 is the correct usage from a human factors point of view. 1 gigawatts is 1000 megawatts. 1 GHz is 1000 MHz. By the same token (and for easier math by humans) 1000 gigabytes is 1000 megabytes. –  Bryan Oakley Aug 31 '09 at 22:37
1  
@Bryan, @john - Users will complain if your program reports a different number than the OS and EVERY other program. If you want a reasonable user experience you should seriously consider sticking to the common convention. However, it's your program to do with as you please, and if you're ready to deal with customer questions regarding what a GiB is, or why your software reports different drive sizes than everything else they see, go for it. Keep in mind that the SI prefixes are great for technical documentation, but not necessarily designed for the end user to understand easily. –  Adam Davis Oct 21 '10 at 14:56
1  
Apple software reports file size and drive storage as 1 GB = 1 billion bytes, and I think I've seen a few other programs do the same. The whole kilo- = 1024 thing arose at a time when saving a few bits on addressable space was a big deal and saving a couple of bit per variable dividing by 1024 was much computationally cheaper than dividing by 1000, but with modern hardware it hardly makes a difference. There's really not much to be gained from caring much about the difference, though. Do whatever makes you happy since some people are going to tell you you're wrong no matter what. –  user2310967 Mar 4 at 13:37

XKCD has the definite answer:

Single, definitive standard for KB

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In KBa the extra bit is used for error detection. ;-D –  Adam Davis Mar 13 '09 at 18:18
    
@Adam Davis For ECC RAM that is actually exactly what is done in practice. –  starblue Mar 13 '09 at 21:38
12  
while funny, it does not answer the question and may confuse those who are easily confused. –  Bryan Oakley Aug 31 '09 at 22:41

/// <summary>
/// Function to convert the given bytes to either Kilobyte, Megabyte, or Gigabyte
/// </summary>
/// <param name="bytes">Double -> Total bytes to be converted</param>
/// <param name="type">String -> Type of conversion to perform</param>
/// <returns>Int32 -> Converted bytes</returns>
/// <remarks></remarks>
public static double ConvertSize(double bytes, string type)
{
    try
    {
        const int CONVERSION_VALUE = 1024;
        //determine what conversion they want
        switch (type)
        {
            case "BY":
                 //convert to bytes (default)
                 return bytes;
                 break;
            case "KB":
                 //convert to kilobytes
                 return (bytes / CONVERSION_VALUE);
                 break;
            case "MB":
                 //convert to megabytes
                 return (bytes / CalculateSquare(CONVERSION_VALUE));
                 break;
            case "GB":
                 //convert to gigabytes
                 return (bytes / CalculateCube(CONVERSION_VALUE));
                 break;
            default:
                 //default
                 return bytes;
                 break;
          }
     }
     catch (Exception ex)
     {
         Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
         return 0;
      }
}

/// <summary>
/// Function to calculate the square of the provided number
/// </summary>
/// <param name="number">Int32 -> Number to be squared</param>
/// <returns>Double -> THe provided number squared</returns>
/// <remarks></remarks>
public static double CalculateSquare(Int32 number)
{
     return Math.Pow(number, 2);
}


/// <summary>
/// Function to calculate the cube of the provided number
/// </summary>
/// <param name="number">Int32 -> Number to be cubed</param>
/// <returns>Double -> THe provided number cubed</returns>
/// <remarks></remarks>
public static double CalculateCube(Int32 number)
{
     return Math.Pow(number, 3);
}

//Sample Useage
String Size = "File is " + ConvertSize(250222,"MB") + " Megabytes in size"
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1024 is actually wrong. The International Engineering Community (IEC) has developed a standard in 2000, which is sadly being ignored by the computer industry. This standard basically says that

  • 1000 bytes is a kilobyte, 1000KB are one MB and so on. The abbreviations are KB, MB, GB and so on.
  • The widely used 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte should instead by called 1024 bytes = 1 Kibibyte (KiB), 1024 KiB = 1 Mebibyte (MiB), 1024 MiB = 1 Gibibyte (GiB) and so on.

You can all read it up on the IEC SI zone.

So in order for your conversions to be correct and right according to international standardization you should use this scientific notation.

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1  
Standard or no, it would be ridiculous to report disk usage in a different way than the host OS! –  Adam Lassek Feb 19 '09 at 16:48
1  
The problem is with those host OS doing it wrong and any end user wondering why the brand new disk he bought in the store reports less once installed than what's printed on its box. –  grover Feb 19 '09 at 17:36
1  
re: "it would be ridiculous to report disk usage in a different way than the host OS": Snow Leopard (Mac OSX 10.6) uses the value 1000 (support.apple.com/kb/TS2419) –  Bryan Oakley Aug 31 '09 at 22:40
    
-1 for the statement of "1024 is actually wrong." IEC might say 1000, but GNU says 1024 (try doing a df -h in Linux). It looks like IEC is just a pawn of hard drive manufacturers. –  User1 Dec 2 '10 at 22:18

It depends on if you want the actual file size or the size on disk. The actual file size is the actual number of bytes that the file uses in memory. The size on disk is a function of the file size and the block size for your disk/file system.

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I have a faint recollection that the answer on whether to use 1000 or 1024 lies in the casing of the prefix. Example: If the "scientific" 1000 scaling is used, then the "scientific" unit will be kB (just as in kg, kN etc). If the computer centric 1024 scaling is used, then the unit will be KB. So, uppercasing the scientific prefix makes it computer centric.

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KB = 1000 bytes, KiB = 1024 bytes –  Brad Gilbert Feb 7 '12 at 22:44
    
+1 For k vs. K this is correct, but it doesn't help when the letter for the ISO prefix is already uppercase, as in M, G and T for Mega, Giga and Tera. And many people, especially from the US, have a tendency to mix up the case of ISO units and prefixes. –  starblue Oct 11 '12 at 8:17

Divide by 1024.

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