Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just started learning and have put together the form below. The confusion I have is when I use empty to validate if the user selected or entered any information, the code generates the error below.

I noticed if I have the following lines of code

if(empty($gender)) {
        $errormessage[2] = "Please select your gender";
    } 

as

if(empty($_POST["gender"])) {
        $errormessage[2] = "Please select your gender";
    }

and

if(empty($gender)) {
        $errormessage[2] = "Please select your gender";
    }

as

if(empty($_POST["gender"])) {
        $errormessage[2] = "Please select your gender";
    }

I do not see the error message. I take it that error message is being generated because of the lines of code $_POST for the gender and media form elements which are radio buttons and checkboxes respectively. However if I want to initialize all the variables at the top, what is the best way to do so?

/* <?php

if(isset($_POST["submit"])) {

    $fname = $_POST["fname"];
    $lname = $_POST["lname"];
    $gender = $_POST["gender"];
    $age = $_POST["age"];
    $address = $_POST["address"];
    $media = $_POST['media'];

    $errormessage =  array();

    if(empty($fname)) {
        $errormessage[0] = "Please enter your first name";
    }

    if(empty($lname)) {
        $errormessage[1] = "Please enter your last name";
    }

    if(empty($gender)) {
        $errormessage[2] = "Please select your gender";
    }

    if(empty($age)) {
        $errormessage[3] = "Please select your age";
    }

    if(empty($address)) {
        $errormessage[4] = "Please enter your address";
    }

    if(empty($media)) {
        $errormessage = "Please select the type of media";

    }

}
?>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Sample Registration</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h2>Sample registration</h4>
        <form name="registration" method="post" action="registration.php">
            <div>
                First Name: <br />
                <input type="text" name="fname" value="">
            </div>

            <div>
                Last Name: <br />
                <input type="text" name="lname" value="">
            </div>

            <div>
                Gender: <br />
                male<input type="radio" name="gender" value="male">
                female<input type="radio" name="gender" value="female">
            </div>

            <div>
                Age: <br />
                <select name="age">
                    <option value="">Please select your age</option>
                    <option value="18-25">18-25</option>
                    <option value="26-33">26-33</option>
                </select>
            </div>

            <div>
                Address: <br />
                <textarea name="address" cols="10" rows="10"></textarea>
            </div>

            <div>
                Sign-me up: <br />
                <input type="checkbox" name="media['newsletter']" value="newsletter"> newsletter
                <input type="checkbox" name="media['specials']" value="specials"> specials
                <input type="checkbox" name="media['events']" value="events"> events

            <div>
                <input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit">
            </div>
        </form>
</body>
</html>

*/

/* Error Message */

! ) Notice: Undefined index: gender in C:\Program Files\EasyPHP-5.3.5.0\www\registration.php on line 7
Call Stack
#   Time    Memory  Function    Location
1   0.0004  341792  {main}( )   ..\registration.php:0
Dump $_SERVER

$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] =



string '127.0.0.1' (length=9)

$_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] =



string 'POST' (length=4)

$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] =



string '/registration.php' (length=17)

Variables in local scope (#1)

$address =

    Undefined

$age =

    Undefined

$errormessage =

    Undefined

$errormsg =

    Undefined

$fname =



string '' (length=0)

$gender =

    Undefined

$lname =



string '' (length=0)

$media =

    Undefined

( ! ) Notice: Undefined index: media in C:\Program Files\EasyPHP-5.3.5.0\www\registration.php on line 10
Call Stack
#   Time    Memory  Function    Location
1   0.0004  341792  {main}( )   ..\registration.php:0
Variables in local scope (#1)

$address =



string '' (length=0)

$age =



string '' (length=0)

$errormessage =

    Undefined

$errormsg =

    Undefined

$fname =



string '' (length=0)

$gender =



null

$lname =



string '' (length=0)

$media =

    Undefined
share|improve this question
    
where are you expecting the error message to show? I don't see where you are trying to display the message. –  MacAnthony Apr 14 '11 at 2:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You'll want to check whether those $_POST['gender'] and $_POST['media'] variables were actually set in the HTTP POST request before you go accessing them; a better solution to initialize each $_POST var might be something like this:

$fname = isset( $_POST['fname'] ) ? $_POST['fname'] : '';

The above ternary assignment is equivalent to running the following logical expression for every single $_POST variable in which you're interested:

if( isset( $_POST['fname'] ) ) {
    $fname = $_POST['fname'];
} else {
    $fname = '';
}

If you implement either of these, you won't get a notice if you run empty() on $gender; furthermore, if $_POST['gender'] wasn't set, empty() will still behave the way you expect. It adds a little verbosity, but to rewrite your example you might try:

if( isset( $_POST["submit"] ) ) {

    $fname = isset( $_POST['fname'] ) ? $_POST["fname"] : '';
    $lname = isset( $_POST['lname'] ) ? $_POST["lname"] : '';
    $gender = isset( $_POST['gender'] ) ? $_POST["gender"] : '';
    $age = isset( $_POST['age'] ) ? $_POST["age"] : '';
    $address = isset( $_POST['address'] ) ? $_POST["address"] : '';
    $media = isset( $_POST['media'] ) ? $_POST['media'] : '';

    $errormessage =  array();
    if( empty( $fname ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please enter your first name";
    if( empty( $lname ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please enter your last name";
    if( empty( $gender ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please select your gender";
    if( empty( $age ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please select your age";
    if( empty( $address ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please enter your address";
    if( empty( $media ) )
        $errormessage[] = "Please select the type of media";
}

Of course, you'd want to clean your data if you're going to use it in a SQL context, but that should at least get you around the error you're facing.

If you had a lot of these variables--or were repeating this task often--you might consider rolling it up into a function!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ryan. Considering I am new to the world of PHP, I am yet to learn about functions especially custom functions. Furthermore, I don't quite follow your example as I have no idea what ? does as well as : ''; in the code example of $fname = isset( $_POST['fname'] ) ? $_POST["fname"] : '';. Would you mind elaborating what it is and does and when I would use it? –  PeanutsMonkey Apr 14 '11 at 3:02
    
Sure! the ?: you see there is the ternary operator in PHP and it works like this: (condition ? "true!" : "false!") for the entire expression enclosed in parentheses, if condition evaluates to true, then the whole expression evaluates to "true!"; otherwise, the whole expression evaluates to "false!"--it's really just a shortcut for if(){}else{} if you want to think of it that way –  Ryan Apr 14 '11 at 3:08
    
Sorry. I still don't follow. What is the condition in the code above? What are we testing as true or false? –  PeanutsMonkey Apr 14 '11 at 3:18
    
In this code: $b = true; $val = ( $b ? "yes" : "no" );, $val == "yes", but in this code: $b = false; $val = ( $b ? "yes" : "no" );, $val == "no". Does that make more sense? –  Ryan Apr 14 '11 at 3:21
    
Yes it does at a very high level. Let me break it down and correct me if I am wrong. I'll use the code I was working on. $fname = ($_POST["gender"] = true ? "yes" : "no"); $fname == "yes". Is that correct? I don't still follow how this is similar with the example you gave. Sorry if I am not following as quickly. –  PeanutsMonkey Apr 14 '11 at 3:27

Try using !isset() instead of empty().

As a side-note, the way you're assigning your variables will create warning notices if that $_POST value doesn't exist. If you'd like to remove those notices, use @Ryan's solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would I use !isset when my understanding is that all I am saying that if isset is not true, then return error message. I know that the elements are not set and returning a NULL value (I think), hence I am using empty() unless I have misunderstood the use of isset. –  PeanutsMonkey Apr 14 '11 at 3:04
    
Example: if $_POST['blah'] doesn't exist in $_POST, then $var = $_POST['blah'] will fail and $var will not be set to anything. –  drudge Apr 14 '11 at 3:22
    
Ok, if it not set to anything them empty should be able to capture the failure. Is that not right? –  PeanutsMonkey Apr 14 '11 at 3:38
    
Technically yes, but you're still generating warning notices. They're not fatal, but they add to your error log and can result in unpredictable behavior in your script. –  drudge Apr 14 '11 at 3:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.