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I have two variables $a and $b

and

$a=Source/dir1/dir11
$b=Destination/dir1/dir11

$a and $b changes but initials Source/ and Destination/ remains same.
I want to compare $a and $b without Source/ and Destination/

how should I do it? Following code I am using

   SOURCE_DIR_LIST=`find Source/ -type d`
   DEST_DIR_LIST=`find Destination/ -type d`

for dir_s in $SOURCE_DIR_LIST
do
    for dir_d in $DEST_DIR_LIST
    do

        if [ ${dir_s/Source\//''} == ${dir_d/Destination\//''} ]
        then
                echo " path match = ${dir_s/Source\//''}"

        else
             echo "path does not match source path = ${dir_s/Source\//''} "
             echo " and destination path= ${dir_d/Destination\//''} "
        fi
    done
done

But output is coming like as follow

 path match = ''
./compare.sh: line 9: [: ==: unary operator expected
path does not match source path = ''
 and destination path= ''dir2
./compare.sh: line 9: [: ==: unary operator expected
more
share|improve this question
1  
FYI you're not actually assigning anything in that expression. Lose the dollar signs to do assignments. –  Chris Apr 14 '11 at 3:34
2  
Are the names 'Source' and 'Destination' fixed, or are they paths held in variables? That could influence the best answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 14 '11 at 3:56
    
i want to comapre even if it changes like $a=Source/dir1/dir11/mydir. I always want to compare without Source/ and Destination/ –  Vivek Apr 14 '11 at 4:17
    
if [ ${a/Source\//''} == ${b/Destination\//''} ] –  Neo Apr 14 '11 at 4:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if [ ${a/Source/''} == ${b/Destination/''} ]
then
  # do your job
fi
share|improve this answer
    
it is not comparing if $a=Source/dir1/dir11/mydir. I always want to compare without Source/ and Destination/ –  Vivek Apr 14 '11 at 4:16
    
change it to if [ ${a/Source\//''} == ${b/Destination\//''} ] –  Neo Apr 14 '11 at 4:20
    
@Hellboy: this isn't going to work too well for you when you don't understand the shell well enough to recognise a correct answer. I suggest you find and work through a couple basic scripting tutorials. –  Tony D Apr 14 '11 at 5:01
    
@Tony I really told i don't know much but I have to do it and I have less time. –  Vivek Apr 14 '11 at 5:22
if [ `echo $a | sed 's/Source\///'` == `echo $b | sed 's/Destination\///'` ]
then
    # Do something
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Better to use '$(...)' than backticks. Also, bash has a '<<<' operator to avoid the pipe. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 14 '11 at 3:55

using case/esac

case "${a#*/}" in
 ${b#*/} ) echo "ok";;
esac
share|improve this answer

or with awk

 #!/bin/bash
    a="Source/dir1/dir11"
    b="Destination/dir1/dir11"
    SAVEIFS=$IFS
    IFS="\/"
    basea=$(echo $a | awk '{print $1}')
    baseb=$(echo $b | awk '{print $1}') 
    if [ $basea == $baseb ]; then
        echo "Equal strings"
    fi
    IFS=$SAVEIFS
share|improve this answer
    
You could use '<<<' to avoid the echo | awk pipeline. Also, basea will contain Source and baseb will contain Destination; you need to print all but $1. And it becomes problematic if Source is actually /mnt/usb-stick/installation/path and Destination is actually /opt/SomeBody/Program. I am not sure why you have the backslash in the IFS, either. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 14 '11 at 4:01

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