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I am using Entity Framework Code First method to create my database table. The following code creates a DATETIME column in the database, but I want to create a DATE column.

[DataType(DataType.Date)]
[DisplayFormatAttribute(ApplyFormatInEditMode = true, DataFormatString = "{0:d}")]
public DateTime ReportDate { get; set; }

How can I create a column of type DATE, during table creation?

Thanks -SR

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3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Try to use ColumnAttribute from System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations (defined in EntityFramework.dll):

[Column(TypeName="Date")]
public DateTime ReportDate { get; set; }
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thanks,let me try it and update you. –  sfgroups Apr 14 '11 at 15:59

I found this works in EF6 nicely.

I created a convention for specifying my data types. This convention changes the default DateTime data type in the database creation from datetime to datetime2. It then applies a more specific rule to any properties that I have decorated with the DataType(DataType.Date) attribute.

public class DateConvention : Convention
{
    public DateConvention()
    {
        this.Properties<DateTime>()
            .Configure(c => c.HasColumnType("datetime2").HasPrecision(3));

        this.Properties<DateTime>()
            .Where(x => x.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<DataTypeAttribute>()
            .Any(a => a.DataType == DataType.Date))
            .Configure(c => c.HasColumnType("date"));
    }
}

Then register then convention in your context:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DateConvention());
    // Additional configuration....
}

Add the attribute to any DateTime properties that you wish to be date only:

public class Participant : EntityBase
{
    public int ID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [Display(Name = "Given Name")]
    public string GivenName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [Display(Name = "Surname")]
    public string Surname { get; set; }

    [DataType(DataType.Date)]
    [Display(Name = "Date of Birth")]
    public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }
}
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1  
Really great solution! One thing i want to add to be completely clear, that in order to use this you need to add the attribute on the date property e.g. [DataType(DataType.Date)] public DateTime IssueDate { get; set; } –  Stephen Lautier Oct 28 at 19:58
    
@StephenLautier yes you must add the attribute if you wish to be able to use this for only specific DateTime properties. In the code I have added, I show that you can also apply a general rule to all your DateTime types and then a more specific rule to those with the DataType(DataType.Date) decoration. Hope this clears up any confusion. –  Tyler Durden Oct 28 at 23:53

Beside using ColumnAttribute you can also create a custom attribute convention for the DataTypeAttribute:

public class DataTypePropertyAttributeConvention : AttributeConfigurationConvention<PropertyInfo, PrimitivePropertyConfiguration, DataTypeAttribute>
{
    public override void Apply(PropertyInfo memberInfo, PrimitivePropertyConfiguration configuration, DataTypeAttribute attribute)
    {
        if (attribute.DataType == DataType.Date)
        {
            configuration.ColumnType = "Date";
        }
    }
}

Just register the convention in your OnModelCreating method:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
     base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

     modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DataTypePropertyAttributeConvention());
}
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This should be built into EF. Thanks for sharing! –  tugberk Jun 20 '13 at 11:02
    
Unfortunately this has been deprecated as of EF6 and is no longer valid. –  Tyler Durden Jul 30 at 0:42

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