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I have something that in principle resembles the following:

public class Generic {

    public Generic(){
        doStuff();
    }

    protected void doStuff(){
        System.out.println("Generic");
    }

}

public class Specific extends Generic {

    public Specific(){
        super();
    }

    protected void doStuff(){
        super.doStuff();
        System.out.println("Specific");
    }

}

The errors I'm getting indicate that although the method is being called from the superclass, it's calling the subclass's version of the method. In the above example, instantiating a new Specific would print out both "Generic" and "Specific", even though doStuff() was called by Generic's constructor.

Long story short, I don't want that. There's some added functionality in the subclass's method that causes problems if it's called before the object is fully initialized. How can I, within the constructor of the superclass, force it to use its own version of the method, rather than the most specialized one?

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Is Specific supposed to be extending Generic? –  squawknull Apr 14 '11 at 3:39
    
...yes. Yes it is. Fixed, thanks. –  macamatic Apr 14 '11 at 3:43
    
you didnt provided the return type for doStuff(). –  Gopal Apr 14 '11 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about having a initialized boolean flag in your Specific class like this:

public class Specific extends Generic {
    boolean initialized = false;
    public Specific(){
        super();
        initialized = true;
    }

    @Override
    protected void doStuff(){
        super.doStuff();
        if (!initialized) return;
        System.out.println("Specific");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        @SuppressWarnings("unused")
        Specific specific = new Specific();
    }
}

This one just calls Generic's doStuff() method since flag initialized is false when parent class is getting constructed and child class is not fully constructed. I believe that was the main reason why didn't want Specific's overridden method to be invoked.

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I was thinking about doing something like this (I wouldn't need a separate property but a conditional to check for initialization). Points anyway. –  macamatic Apr 14 '11 at 3:57

I don't think you can have a function in Java that both A) can be overridden, and B) doesn't behave polymorphically when called. I would suggest you do something like this to simulate the behavior you're asking about:

public class Generic {

    public Generic(){
        doGenericStuff();
    }

    private final void doGenericStuff() {
        System.out.println("Generic");
    }

    protected doStuff(){
        doGenericStuff();
    }

}

public class Specific extends Generic {

    public Specific(){
        super();
    }

    protected doStuff(){
        super.doStuff();
        System.out.println("Specific");
    }

}
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