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I am trying to create a light weight cross platform Message Box that contains a list of items. Ideally it has an API that allows you to pass in a message to to display, a title, and tuple of choices. When pressing OK it would return the currently selected choice. It would also be preferred that the required modules be part of the standard python distributions.

Easygui has what I am looking for called a choicebox found at http://easygui.sourceforge.net/download/version0.95/tutorial/index.html#contents_item_10.1. However the window it pops up is monstrous and it always sorts your list of choices alphabetically. Because of these 'features', easygui is not ideal.

I have also looked into bwidgets, pmw, and Tix. While trying these I have come across a few issues including: difficultly finding working examples and failures across different platforms.

My working model is using Tkinter's OptionMenu and pickle to return the data (see code samples below). While this works, it is rather annoying having to save the choice to the file system to avoid using global variables. Is there a way to return the selection upon destruction of the gui?

Any help / advice would be greatly appreciated. Note that these examples are only for reference, they may or may not run properly on your system.

State Management Module

import pickle

def store(pkl_path, data_to_store):
    try:
        fid = open(pkl_path, 'w')
        pickle.dump(data_to_store, fid)
    except:
        print 'Unable to store data in ' + pkl_path
    else:
        fid.close()

def load(pkl_path):
    try:
        fid = open(pkl_path, 'r')
        loaded_state = pickle.load(fid)
        fid.close()
    except:
        loaded_state = None
    else:
        fid.close()

    return loaded_state

Menu Module

from Tkinter import *

def Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel(title, options, pickle_file, default_selection=0):
    master = Tk()
    master.title(title)

    var = StringVar(master)
    var.set(options[default_selection]) # default value

    w = OptionMenu(master, var, *options)
    w.pack()

    def ok():
        state.store(pickle_file, var.get())
        master.quit()

    def cancel():
        state.store(pickle_file, None)
        master.quit()

    button = Button(master, text="OK", command=ok)
    button.pack()
    b2 = Button(master, text="Cancel", command=cancel)
    b2.pack()

    mainloop()

Example Usage

from menu_module import *

def display_com_selection():
    pkl_path = '.tmp/comm_selection'

    title = 'COM Port Selection'
    Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel(title,get_available_com(),pkl_path)

    selection = state.load(pkl_path)

    return selection

EDIT

Disregarding my concern about global variables, I tried an implementation using them to see if it was any easier. It makes things substantially easier, however my question still stands for a better way to do this.

Below is the reworked Menu Module

from Tkinter import *
Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection = None

def Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel(title, message, options, default_selection=0):
    master = Tk()
    master.title(title)
    var = StringVar(master)
    var.set(options[default_selection]) # default value
    l = Label(master, text=message)
    l.pack()
    w = OptionMenu(master, var, *options)
    w.pack(fill=BOTH, expand=1)

    def ok():
        global Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection
        Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection = str(var.get())
        master.destroy()

    def cancel():
        global Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection
        Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection = str(var.get())
        master.destroy()

    button = Button(master, text="OK", command=ok)
    button.pack(side=LEFT)
    b2 = Button(master, text="Cancel", command=cancel)
    b2.pack(side=LEFT)

    mainloop()

    return Prompt_Dropdown_Ok_Cancel_Selection
share|improve this question

The normal way dialogs work is something like this:

mydialog = SomeDialogClass(...)
result = mydialog.Show()
if  result == "OK":
    print "you clicked OK; dialog value is", mydialog.GetValue()
else:
    print "you clicked cancel"
mydialog.Destroy()

This is pseudocode, intended to be GUI toolkit agnostic (though admittedly it looks a lot like wxPython). The main idea is, you create the dialog as an object, ask the object to show itself, wait until the user is done (by virtue of clicking "OK" or "Cancel"), then asking the object for its data and then finally destroying the object (or, keep it around for re-use).

A second way to do this is to write your code such that you give the dialog a function to call in order to set the value. Something like this:

mydialog = SomeDialogClass(..., callback=self.foo)
....
def foo(self, button, result):
    if button == "OK":
        print "you clicked OK; result is", result
    elif button == "Cancel":
        print "you clicked Cancel"

This second method works well if your dialog is not modal (ie: your program continues to run while the dialog is present).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. First off I agree with you statements completely. What I am trying to achieve is the first example, but the issue I am facing is that the "SomeDialogClass" doesn't exist in the fashion that I like. I am having to create my own class to achieve this. This being said, do you have an ideas on how to return values from a dialog without using globals? – Adam Lewis Apr 14 '11 at 13:35
    
@Adam Lewis: I don't understand your question - my examples don't use globals. – Bryan Oakley May 22 '11 at 13:30
    
The question is how to return a value from the exiting TK object rather than just print something to stdout. The only way I have been able to achieve this is to use pickle or global variables (neither of which I like). I know that some of the existing dialogs return things like 'yes' or 'no', but there is no built-in dropdown dialog box that returns the selected value. – Adam Lewis May 23 '11 at 3:09
    
@Adam Lewis: I still don't understand the problem. My very first example shows how to return a value. Don't you see where a value is returned? The print is just for illustrative purposes. You instantiate the class, call the Show method, and when it returns you can ask the dialog what the value is. Of course, you can modify Show() to return "yes" or "no" if you wish... – Bryan Oakley May 23 '11 at 22:17
    
I see where it is returned. As I said in my first comment, this is the use case I am looking for but the "SomeDialogClass" I am looking for does not exist. I am trying to roll my own and when I call mainloop (see my examples above) I have been unsuccessful on returning any value (it returns an empty list). As stated in the question above: Is there any way to return a value on destruction from a Tk() object. – Adam Lewis May 24 '11 at 1:58

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