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In jni we have GetPrimitiveArrayElements functions to get pointer to the array elements on the heap and ReleasePrimitiveArrayElements to remove the local copy of the arrays.

however I am passing array of java objects to JNI.These array elements are iterated using GetObjectArrayElement function to local jobject.

But how can I remove the local reference of the jobject after processing of the array elements.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

If the jobjects you are grabbing were originally allocated on the java side, they will be handled by garbage colllection (I'm pretty sure) as long as there are no lingering references to the objects. Therefore, if your local references to the jobjects are just local variables, they will disappear at the end of the function and your object will be garbage collected (assuming you aren't keeping the array around in java...if you are then the object will still exist and the local reference will just disappear like any local variable that wasn't allocated heap space).

EDIT: Also, if you wanna release you local reference right away and not wait (like if you were creating a ton of jobject references in a single funciton, just use the DeleteLocalRef(env, jobj); method of JNIEnv.

In any case...this link should tell you everything you need to know if I have made any mistakes...

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jni/html/refs.html

good luck

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The link will not work. –  user210504 Oct 2 '12 at 18:49
    
@Nitrex88 Sorry. My downvote was a mistake. I was wrong. I can't cancel it, since your anwser is too old. Edit it, and i will upvote. –  manuell Nov 29 '13 at 20:29

Beware, the other answser is plain wrong. If you get a jobject in JNI through GetObjectArrayElement, you must use DeleteLocalRef on that object before returning. Going out of scope, DOES NOT release "local reference", and not doing the DeleteLocalRef will leak memory.

Hum. EDIT.

I think I exaggerated a bit. You don't have to DeleteLocalRef when you are just in the context of a JNI function called by JAVA.

My statements come from very annoying debugging session, chasing memory leaks, but I was processing Java ovjects passed to another Native Thread, via NewGlobalRef and native asynchronous messaging (in that case, you MUST have a DeleteLocalRef for each NewLocalRef.

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