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I have an array e.g.

Float[] flObj = new Float[]{1.2, 2.3, 3.5};

to be able to serialize this object, I make a class FloatArray and have the constructor like this:

[Serializable]  
public class FloatArray
>{  
....
public float[] _arrSetPoint;

        [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnore]
        public float this[int idx]
        {
            set
            {
                if (idx >= 0 && idx < _arrSize)
                    _arrSetPoint[idx] = (float)value;
                else
                    throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            }
            get
            {
                if (idx >= 0 && idx < _arrSize)
                    return _arrSetPoint[idx];
                else
                    throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            }
        }
}

When I serialize this class, I got:

<flObj >  
 <float> value=1.2</float>  
 <float> value=2.3</float>  
 <float> value=3.5</float>  
</flObj >

How can I get the following xml?

<flObj >
 <float.0> value=1.2</float>
 <float.1> value=2.3</float>
 <float.2> value=3.5</float>
</flObj >
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3 Answers 3

Your second version is not valid XML and cannot be output using the .NET built in serializers.

You can write your own custom serializer to output the exact format you want.

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If you used a dictionary with the int as the key and serialized that, you would capture something like what you are asking for.

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Not quite sure why you're creating your own array type here rather than just creating a fixed-size array instead.

float[] a = new float[10];

Also, I recommend learning LINQ - it's beauty and expressiveness will just blow you away:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Xml.Linq;

namespace SerializeFloatArray
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Create a fixed-length array of floats:
            float[] a = new float[10];

            // Initialize the array to contain some content.
            for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
            {
                a[i] = float.Parse(i.ToString() + '.' + (i + 1).ToString());
            }

            // Create an XML document containing XML elements named as you require.
            int j = 0;
            var doc = new XDocument(
                new XElement("floats",
                    from f in a
                    select new XElement("f." + j++.ToString(), f)));

            // Display doc serialized to text. You could write this to a 
            // file if you want.
            Console.WriteLine(doc);
        }
    }
}
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