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Until yesterday I thought that I had understood the iPhones memory management. Well here is my problem:

// .h file
     @property(nonatomic, retain) NSMutableDictionary *dicParams;
     @property(nonatomic, retain) NSMutableDictionary *dicReferences;
     @property(nonatomic, retain) FtMonitorHandler *monitorHandler;

// .m file
@synthesize dicParams, dicReferences, monitorHandler;

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];

    if (self) {
        self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
        self.dicReferences = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
        self.monitorHandler = [[FtMonitorHandlerService alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}


- (void)dealloc {
    [monitorHandler release];
    [dicParams release];
    [dicReferences release];
    [super dealloc];
}

If I set somewhere else, after the viewcontroller's allocation for example

self.dicParams = dicValues;

… it will turn into a leak

My understanding of setting instance variables with "self. …" was, that the current value will be "released" and then set with "retain".

I tried a little bit with instruments. Results:

-(void)createLeak { 
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; 
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; 
}

-(void)createAnotherLeak { 
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; 
    self.dicParams = nil; 
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; 
}

- (void)createWithoutLeak { 
    if(dicParams != nil) [dicParams release]; 
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
}

Have I missed something, or is this the behavior as it should be?

EDIT: I tried to implement the suggested changes. It works fine, as long, as my variable is not GUI element. (UIView, UILabel, etc)

The autorelease will cause an app crash after a memory warning

- (void)loadView {  
    [super loadView];
    // ... here is some other stuff ...  
    self.lblDeparture = [[[UILabel alloc] init] autorelease];  
}  

- (void)viewDidUnload {  
    [super viewDidUnload];  
    // Release any retained subviews of the main view.  
    self.lblDeparture = nil;
}

- (void)dealloc {  
    [lblDeparture release];  
    [super dealloc];  
}  

I'm not quite sure, but I assume that the following lines are the real issue:

CGRect frame = CGRectMake(0, 0, self.view.frame.size.width, INFO_VIEW_HEIGHT);  
UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:frame];  

[imageView addSubview:lblDeparture];  
[lblDeparture release];  // is this correct?

[self.view addSubview:imageView];  
[imageView release];  
share|improve this question
    
why you are using self.yourObjects, you are in same class so rather than retaining it(by calling self.yourObject) you can try without self. –  Ravin Apr 14 '11 at 6:28
    
wouldn't there be a leak if I assign the variable twice with "variable = …", because the first reference will be gone? without "self.variable …" –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 6:43
    
no I am saying you should try with dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; rather than self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; . –  Ravin Apr 14 '11 at 6:46
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5 Answers

if you init you need to auto release.

-(void)dontCreateAnotherLeak {
    self.dicParams = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];
    self.dicParams = nil;
    self.dicParams = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];
}

the easier equivalent is to use the convenience accessor.

self.dicParams = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];

if you would like to handle this yourself. On top of the @synthesize dictParams; you will also want to create your own setter.

-(void)setDictParams:(NSMutableDictionary*) newDictParams
{
    if (dictParams != newDictParams)
    {
        [dictParams release];
        dictParams = [newDictParams retain];
    }
}

this is a little simple. but essentially what the compiler creates with the retain modifier added to the @property tag

share|improve this answer
1  
More specifically when you init and pass into a setter that ALSO retains, you need to autorelease... –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Apr 14 '11 at 6:28
    
Even better - wrap that up as [NSMutableDictionary dictionary] –  Nick Forge Apr 14 '11 at 6:30
    
Thanks for your reply. I've tested it and it worked fine. Though i prefer to use it without autorelease and create a temporary variable that i release afterwards –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 6:35
    
there is no performance problems with using an autoreleased object. however if you want to do it yourself then you will need to implement your own setDictParams method. Ill add that to my answer. –  Volure DarkAngel Apr 14 '11 at 6:45
1  
Your example of the setDictParams: method is wrong. You either need to retain before you release or you need to check if newDictParams != dictParams first. Otherwise this will blow up if you call the setter with the current object. –  Sven Apr 14 '11 at 7:03
show 3 more comments

If you set a instance variable for which you have specified retain in property retain count becomes 1

Now as you call with reference to self as in case “self.variable = value” increase the retain count by 1, So the total retain count becomes 2.

So now to release it you need to bring retain count to 0. Hence you need to release it twice.

Hopew this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Great answer. To the point and well explained :) –  Parth Bhatt Apr 14 '11 at 6:35
    
would it be a possibility to use @property(assign) instead if I prefer to use "self. …" –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 6:44
    
@user707342 : Will not recommend you for assign but you can use below self.myVariable = nil ; before setting it again .... –  Jhaliya Apr 14 '11 at 6:51
    
Sorry, you probably meant to say the right thing, but what’s actually written here is wrong! –  Sven Apr 14 '11 at 7:00
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I am not sure I understand the question fully, however your second part is easily explained...

-(void)createLeak {

self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

that's clear...

now but this one

-(void)createAnotherLeak {

self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

self.dicParams = nil;

self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; }

does not release the first alloced self.dicParams but rather forgets any reference to it by setting it to nil and then resetting it with a new one. Setting to nil is not equal to release. If you would have created the first one with autorelease and then set it to nil it's something different. That should work correctly. And that's exatcly what you do with your 3rd example!

Now as to your inital question, what is it that leaks when you write

self.dicParams = dicValues;

?

the variable self.dicParams should just hold the value until you release it again

share|improve this answer
    
i can't say it for sure but instruments marks an other object that has two NSArrays and does the self.lines = [NSArray alloc] init]; My parser later overwrites this array with new values causing the suspected leak. –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 6:55
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I recommend you read Apple's Memory Management Programming Guide carefully. http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/MemoryMgmt.html

It's all explained in there.

There are a couple of obvious mistakes I can see that you are making.

Firstly, you shouldn't use accessors in init or dealloc.

So, this

- (id)init { 
 self = [super init];

 if (self) {
    self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    self.dicReferences = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    self.monitorHandler = [[FtMonitorHandlerService alloc] init];
 }
 return self;
} 

should be

- (id)init { 
 self = [super init];

 if (self) {
    dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    dicReferences = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    monitorHandler = [[FtMonitorHandlerService alloc] init];
 }
 return self;
} 

Secondly, when you set a retained property, the you need to release the whatever you are setting it to.

So, this

self.dicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

should be

self.dicParams = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];

or you can do this

NSMutableDictionary *newDicParams = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
self.dicParams = newDicParams;
[newDictParams release];
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your explainations :-) Has you last described method any benefits over the allocation with autorelease in this perspective? –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 7:16
    
Releasing manually is preferable to autorelease because it is effective immediately. An autoreleased object gets released when it goes out of scope. –  benwong Apr 14 '11 at 10:15
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The setter generated by @synthesize for a (readwrite, retain, nonatomic) property looks something like this:

 - (void) setSomething: (id) newSomething;
 {
      if (something != newSomething) {
          [something release];
          something = [newSomething retain];
      }
 }

The old object pointed to by the instance variable something will be released while the new object will be retained.

Your mistake is the object creation. You create your dictionary with [[NSDictionary alloc] init]. This dictionary has a retain count of 1. Your setter retains the object, so the new retain count is 2. When you call the setter again the retain count of your original dictionary correctly gets decreased - it’s 1 again. For the dictionary to be freed you’d have to release it again. For this there is autorelease. An autoreleased object will get released some time later. So the correct code to set your property would be

 self.something = [[[NSDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];

or even better using the convenience allocator

 self.something = [NSDictionary dictionary];

You really should read and understand Apple’s memory management guide - it’s all explained in there.

By the way, I talked about retain counts here. It’s OK to think about them, but you should never ask an object about it’s retain count, that value is useless, since it’s rarely what you would think.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this your explaination. This will help me a lot :-) –  user707342 Apr 14 '11 at 7:23
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